next up previous contents index
Next: 3.4 User Priorities and Up: 3. Administrators' Manual Previous: 3.2 Installation   Contents   Index

Subsections


3.3 Configuration

This section describes how to configure all parts of the Condor system. General information about the configuration files and their syntax is followed by a description of settings that affect all Condor daemons and tools. The settings that control the policy under which Condor will start, suspend, resume, vacate or kill jobs are described in section 3.5 on Startd Policy Configuration.


3.3.1 Introduction to Configuration Files

The Condor configuration files are used to customize how Condor operates at a given site. The basic configuration as shipped with Condor works well for most sites.

Each Condor program will, as part of its initialization process, configure itself by calling a library routine which parses the various configuration files that might be used including pool-wide, platform-specific, machine-specific, and root-owned configuration files. Environment variables may also contribute to the configuration.

The result of configuration is a list of key/value pairs. Each key is a configuration variable name, and each value is a string literal that may utilize macro substitution (as defined below). Note that the string literal value portion of a pair is not an expression, and therefore it is not evaluated. Those configuration variables that express the policy for starting and stopping of jobs appear as expressions in the configuration file. However, these expressions (for configuration) are string literals. At appropriate times, Condor daemons and tools use these strings as expressions, parsing them in order to do evaluation.


3.3.1.1 Ordered Evaluation to Set the Configuration

Multiple files, as well as a program's environment variables determine the configuration. The order in which attributes are defined is important, as later definitions override existing definitions. The order in which the (multiple) configuration files are parsed is designed to ensure the security of the system. Attributes which must be set a specific way must appear in the last file to be parsed. This prevents both the naive and the malicious Condor user from subverting the system through its configuration. The order in which items are parsed is

  1. global configuration file
  2. local configuration file
  3. global root-owned configuration file
  4. local root-owned configuration file
  5. specific environment variables prefixed with _CONDOR_

The locations for these files are as given in section 3.2.2 on page [*].

Some Condor tools utilize environment variables to set their configuration. These tools search for specifically-named environment variables. The variables are prefixed by the string _CONDOR_ or _condor_. The tools strip off the prefix, and utilize what remains as configuration. As the use of environment variables is the last within the ordered evaluation, the environment variable definition is used. The security of the system is not compromised, as only specific variables are considered for definition in this manner, not any environment variables with the _CONDOR_ prefix.


3.3.1.2 Configuration File Macros

Macro definitions are of the form:

<macro_name> = <macro_definition>

NOTE: There must be white space between the macro name, the ``='' sign, and the macro definition.

Macro invocations are of the form:

$(macro_name)

Macro definitions may contain references to other macros, even ones that are not yet defined (as long as they are eventually defined in the configuration files). All macro expansion is done after all configuration files have been parsed (with the exception of macros that reference themselves, described below).

A = xxx
C = $(A)
is a legal set of macro definitions, and the resulting value of C is xxx. Note that C is actually bound to $(A), not its value.

As a further example,

A = xxx
C = $(A)
A = yyy
is also a legal set of macro definitions, and the resulting value of C is yyy.

A macro may be incrementally defined by invoking itself in its definition. For example,

A = xxx
B = $(A)
A = $(A)yyy
A = $(A)zzz
is a legal set of macro definitions, and the resulting value of A is xxxyyyzzz. Note that invocations of a macro in its own definition are immediately expanded. $(A) is immediately expanded in line 3 of the example. If it were not, then the definition would be impossible to evaluate.

Recursively defined macros such as

A = $(B)
B = $(A)
are not allowed. They create definitions that Condor refuses to parse.

NOTE: Macros should not be incrementally defined in the LOCAL_ROOT_CONFIG_FILE for security reasons.

All entries in a configuration file must have an operator, which will be an equals sign (=). Identifiers are alphanumerics combined with the underscore character, optionally with a subsystem name and a period as a prefix. As a special case, a line without an operator that begins with a left square bracket will be ignored. The following two-line example treats the first line as a comment, and correctly handles the second line.

[Condor Settings]
my_classad = [ foo=bar ]

To simplify pool administration, any configuration variable name may be prefixed by a subsystem (see the $(SUBSYSTEM) macro in section 3.3.1 for the list of subsystems) and the period (.) character. For configuration variables defined this way, the value is applied to the specific subsystem. For example, the ports that Condor may use can be restricted to a range using the HIGHPORT and LOWPORT configuration variables. If the range of intended ports is different for specific daemons, this syntax may be used.

  MASTER.LOWPORT   = 20000
  MASTER.HIGHPORT  = 20100
  NEGOTIATOR.LOWPORT   =  22000 
  NEGOTIATOR.HIGHPORT  =  22100

Note that all configuration variables may utilize this syntax, but nonsense configuration variables may result. For example, it makes no sense to define

  NEGOTIATOR.MASTER_UPDATE_INTERVAL = 60
since the condor_ negotiator daemon does not use the MASTER_UPDATE_INTERVAL variable.

It makes little sense to do so, but Condor will configure correctly with a definition such as

  MASTER.MASTER_UPDATE_INTERVAL = 60
The condor_ master uses this configuration variable, and the prefix of MASTER. causes this configuration to be specific to the condor_ master daemon.


3.3.1.3 Comments and Line Continuations

A Condor configuration file may contain comments and line continuations. A comment is any line beginning with a ``#'' character. A continuation is any entry that continues across multiples lines. Line continuation is accomplished by placing the ``$\backslash$'' character at the end of any line to be continued onto another. Valid examples of line continuation are

  START = (KeyboardIdle > 15 * $(MINUTE)) && \
  ((LoadAvg - CondorLoadAvg) <= 0.3)
and
  ADMIN_MACHINES = condor.cs.wisc.edu, raven.cs.wisc.edu, \
  stork.cs.wisc.edu, ostrich.cs.wisc.edu, \
  bigbird.cs.wisc.edu
  HOSTALLOW_ADMIN = $(ADMIN_MACHINES)

Note that a line continuation character may currently be used within a comment, so the following example does not set the configuration variable FOO:

  # This comment includes the following line, so FOO is NOT set \
  FOO = BAR
It is a poor idea to use this functionality, as it is likely to stop working in future Condor releases.


3.3.1.4 Executing a Program to Produce Configuration Macros

Instead of reading from a file, Condor may run a program to obtain configuration macros. The vertical bar character (| ) as the last character defining a file name provides the syntax necessary to tell Condor to run a program. This syntax may only be used in the definition of the CONDOR_CONFIG environment variable, the LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE configuration variable, or the LOCAL_ROOT_CONFIG_FILE configuration variable.

The command line for the program is formed by the characters preceding the vertical bar character. The standard output of the program is parsed as a configuration file would be.

An example:

LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE = /bin/make_the_config|

Program /bin/make_the_config is executed, and its output is the set of configuration macros.

Note that either a program is executed to generate the configuration macros or the configuration is read from one or more files. The syntax uses space characters to separate command line elements, if an executed program produces the configuration macros. Space characters would otherwise separate the list of files. This syntax does not permit distinguishing one from the other, so only one may be specified.


3.3.1.5 Pre-Defined Macros

Condor provides pre-defined macros that help configure Condor. Pre-defined macros are listed as $(macro_name).

This first set are entries whose values are determined at run time and cannot be overwritten. These are inserted automatically by the library routine which parses the configuration files.

$(FULL_HOSTNAME)
The fully qualified hostname of the local machine (hostname plus domain name).

$(HOSTNAME)
The hostname of the local machine (no domain name).

$(IP_ADDRESS)
The ASCII string version of the local machine's IP address.

$(TILDE)
The full path to the home directory of the Unix user condor, if such a user exists on the local machine.

$(SUBSYSTEM)
The subsystem name of the daemon or tool that is evaluating the macro. This is a unique string which identifies a given daemon within the Condor system. The possible subsystem names are:

This second set of macros are entries whose default values are determined automatically at runtime but which can be overwritten.

$(ARCH)
Defines the string used to identify the architecture of the local machine to Condor. The condor_ startd will advertise itself with this attribute so that users can submit binaries compiled for a given platform and force them to run on the correct machines. condor_ submit will append a requirement to the job ClassAd that it must run on the same ARCH and OPSYS of the machine where it was submitted, unless the user specifies ARCH and/or OPSYS explicitly in their submit file. See the the condor_ submit manual page on page [*] for details.

$(OPSYS)
Defines the string used to identify the operating system of the local machine to Condor. If it is not defined in the configuration file, Condor will automatically insert the operating system of this machine as determined by uname.

$(UNAME_ARCH)
The architecture as reported by uname(2)'s machine field. Always the same as ARCH on Windows.

$(UNAME_OPSYS)
The operating system as reported by uname(2)'s sysname field. Always the same as OPSYS on Windows.

$(PID)
The process ID for the daemon or tool.

$(PPID)
The process ID of the parent process for the daemon or tool.

$(USERNAME)
The user name of the UID of the daemon or tool. It is useful for setting GRIDMANAGER_LOG, as that needs to be done on a per-user basis. For daemons started as root, but running under another UID (typically the user condor), this will be the other UID.

$(FILESYSTEM_DOMAIN)
Defaults to the fully qualified hostname of the machine it is evaluated on. See section 3.3.7, Shared File System Configuration File Entries for the full description of its use and under what conditions you would want to change it.

$(UID_DOMAIN)
Defaults to the fully qualified hostname of the machine it is evaluated on. See section 3.3.7 for the full description of this configuration variable.

Since $(ARCH) and $(OPSYS) will automatically be set to the correct values, we recommend that you do not overwrite them. Only do so if you know what you are doing.


3.3.2 The Special Configuration Macros $ENV(), $RANDOM_CHOICE(), and $RANDOM_INTEGER()

References to the Condor process's environment are allowed in the configuration files. Environment references use the ENV macro and are of the form:

  $ENV(environment_variable_name)
For example,
  A = $ENV(HOME)
binds A to the value of the HOME environment variable. Environment references are not currently used in standard Condor configurations. However, they can sometimes be useful in custom configurations.

This same syntax is used in the RANDOM_CHOICE() macro to allow a random choice of a parameter within a configuration file. These references are of the form:

  $RANDOM_CHOICE(list of parameters)
This allows a random choice within the parameter list to be made at configuration time. Of the list of parameters, one is chosen when encountered during configuration. For example, if one of the integers 0-8 (inclusive) should be randomly chosen, the macro usage is
  $RANDOM_CHOICE(0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8)

The RANDOM_INTEGER() macro is similar to the RANDOM_CHOICE() macro, and is used to select a random integer within a configuration file. References are of the form:

  $RANDOM_INTEGER(min, max [, step])
A random integer within the range min and max, inclusive, is selected at configuration time. The optional step parameter controls the stride within the range, and it defaults to the value 1. For example, to randomly chose an even integer in the range 0-8 (inclusive), the macro usage is
  $RANDOM_INTEGER(0, 8, 2)

See section 7.2 on page [*] for an actual use of this specialized macro.


3.3.3 Condor-wide Configuration File Entries

This section describes settings which affect all parts of the Condor system. Other system-wide settings can be found in section 3.3.6 on ``Network-Related Configuration File Entries'', and section 3.3.7 on ``Shared File System Configuration File Entries''.

CONDOR_HOST
This macro may be used to define the $(NEGOTIATOR_HOST) and is used to define the $(COLLECTOR_HOST) macro. Normally the condor_ collector and condor_ negotiator would run on the same machine. If for some reason they were not run on the same machine, $(CONDOR_HOST) would not be needed. Some of the host-based security macros use $(CONDOR_HOST) by default. See section 3.6.10, on Setting up IP/host-based security in Condor for details.

COLLECTOR_HOST
The hostname of the machine where the condor_ collector is running for your pool. Normally, it is defined relative to the $(CONDOR_HOST) macro. There is no default value for this macro; COLLECTOR_HOST must be defined for the pool to work properly.

In addition to defining the hostname, this setting can optionally be used to specify the network port of the condor_ collector. The port is separated from the hostname by a colon (':'). For example,

    COLLECTOR_HOST = $(CONDOR_HOST):1234
If no port is specified, the default port of 9618 is used. Using the default port is recommended for most sites. It is only changed if there is a conflict with another service listening on the same network port. For more information about specifying a non-standard port for the condor_ collector daemon, see section 3.7.1 on page [*].

NEGOTIATOR_HOST
This configuration variable is no longer used. The port where the condor_ negotiator is listening is normally dynamically allocated since version 6.7.4.

For pools running 6.7.3 and older versions: The host name of the machine where the condor_ negotiator is running for the pool. Normally, it is defined relative to the $(CONDOR_HOST) macro. There is no default value for this macro; NEGOTIATOR_HOST must be defined for the pool to work properly. This variable may also be used to optionally define a network port for the condor_ negotiator daemon, as explained for the COLLECTOR_HOST variable.

CONDOR_VIEW_HOST
The hostname of the machine where the CondorView server is running. This service is optional, and requires additional configuration if you want to enable it. There is no default value for CONDOR_VIEW_HOST. If CONDOR_VIEW_HOST is not defined, no CondorView server is used. See section 3.12.5 on page [*] for more details.

SCHEDD_HOST
The hostname of the machine where the condor_ schedd is running for your pool. This is the host that queues submitted jobs. Note that, in most condor installations, there is a condor_ schedd running on each host from which jobs are submitted. The default value of SCHEDD_HOST is the current host. For most pools, this macro is not defined.

RELEASE_DIR
The full path to the Condor release directory, which holds the bin, etc, lib, and sbin directories. Other macros are defined relative to this one. There is no default value for RELEASE_DIR .

BIN
This directory points to the Condor directory where user-level programs are installed. It is usually defined relative to the $(RELEASE_DIR) macro. There is no default value for BIN .

LIB
This directory points to the Condor directory where libraries used to link jobs for Condor's standard universe are stored. The condor_ compile program uses this macro to find these libraries, so it must be defined for condor_ compile to function. $(LIB) is usually defined relative to the $(RELEASE_DIR) macro, and has no default value.

LIBEXEC
This directory points to the Condor directory where support commands that Condor needs will be placed. Do not add this directory to a user or system-wide path.

INCLUDE
This directory points to the Condor directory where header files reside. $(INCLUDE) would usually be defined relative to the $(RELEASE_DIR) configuration macro. There is no default value, but if defined, it can make inclusion of necessary header files for compilation of programs (such as those programs that use libcondorapi.a) easier through the use of condor_ config_val.

SBIN
This directory points to the Condor directory where Condor's system binaries (such as the binaries for the Condor daemons) and administrative tools are installed. Whatever directory $(SBIN) points to ought to be in the PATH of users acting as Condor administrators. SBIN has no default value.

LOCAL_DIR
The location of the local Condor directory on each machine in your pool. One common option is to use the condor user's home directory which may be specified with $(TILDE). There is no default value for LOCAL_DIR . For example:
    LOCAL_DIR = $(tilde)

On machines with a shared file system, where either the $(TILDE) directory or another directory you want to use is shared among all machines in your pool, you might use the $(HOSTNAME) macro and have a directory with many subdirectories, one for each machine in your pool, each named by host names. For example:

    LOCAL_DIR = $(tilde)/hosts/$(hostname)
or:
    LOCAL_DIR = $(release_dir)/hosts/$(hostname)

LOG
Used to specify the directory where each Condor daemon writes its log files. The names of the log files themselves are defined with other macros, which use the $(LOG) macro by default. The log directory also acts as the current working directory of the Condor daemons as the run, so if one of them should produce a core file for any reason, it would be placed in the directory defined by this macro. LOG is required to be defined. Normally, $(LOG) is defined in terms of $(LOCAL_DIR).

SPOOL
The spool directory is where certain files used by the condor_ schedd are stored, such as the job queue file and the initial executables of any jobs that have been submitted. In addition, for systems not using a checkpoint server, all the checkpoint files from jobs that have been submitted from a given machine will be store in that machine's spool directory. Therefore, you will want to ensure that the spool directory is located on a partition with enough disk space. If a given machine is only set up to execute Condor jobs and not submit them, it would not need a spool directory (or this macro defined). There is no default value for SPOOL , and the condor_ schedd will not function without it SPOOL defined. Normally, $(SPOOL) is defined in terms of $(LOCAL_DIR).

EXECUTE
This directory acts as the current working directory of any Condor job that is executing on the local machine. If a given machine is only set up to only submit jobs and not execute them, it would not need an execute directory (or this macro defined). There is no default value for EXECUTE, and the condor_ startd will not function if EXECUTE is not defined. Normally, $(EXECUTE) is defined in terms of $(LOCAL_DIR).

LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE
Identifies the location of the local, machine-specific configuration file for each machine in the pool. The two most common choices would be putting this file in the $(LOCAL_DIR), or putting all local configuration files for the pool in a shared directory, each one named by host name. For example,
    LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE = $(LOCAL_DIR)/condor_config.local
or,
    LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE = $(release_dir)/etc/$(hostname).local
or, not using the release directory
    LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE = /full/path/to/configs/$(hostname).local

The value of $(LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE) is treated as a list of files, not a single file. The items in the list are delimited by either commas or space characters. This allows the specification of multiple files as the local configuration file, each one processed in the order given (with parameters set in later files overriding values from previous files). This allows the use of one global configuration file for multiple platforms in the pool, defines a platform-specific configuration file for each platform, and uses a local configuration file for each machine. If the list of files is changed in one of the later read files, the new list replaces the old list, but any files that have already been processed remain processed, and are removed from the new list if they are present to prevent cycles. See section 3.3.1 on page [*] for directions on using a program to generate the configuration macros that would otherwise reside in one or more files as described here. If LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE is not defined, no local configuration files are processed. For more information on this, see section 3.12.2 about Configuring Condor for Multiple Platforms on page [*].

REQUIRE_LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE
Beginning in Condor 6.5.5, it is permissible for files listed in LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE to be missing. This is most useful for sites that have large numbers of machines in the pool, and a local configuration file that uses the $(HOSTNAME) macro in its definition. Instead of having an empty file for every host in the pool, files can simply be omitted. The default value is True, causing Condor to exit with an error, if a file listed as the local configuration file cannot be read. A value of False allows local configuration files to be missing.

LOCAL_CONFIG_DIR
Beginning in Condor 6.7.18, a directory may be used as a container for local configuration files. The files found in the directory are sorted into lexicographical order, and then each file is treated as though it was listed in LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE. LOCAL_CONFIG_DIR is processed before any files listed in LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE, and is checked again after processing the LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE list. It is a list of directories, and each directory is processed in the order it appears in the list. The process is not recursive, so any directories found inside the directory being processed are ignored.

LOCAL_ROOT_CONFIG_FILE
A comma or space separated list of path and file names specifying the local, root configuration files.

CONDOR_IDS
The User ID (UID) and Group ID (GID) pair that the Condor daemons should run as, if the daemons are spawned as root. This value can also be specified in the CONDOR_IDS environment variable. If the Condor daemons are not started as root, then neither this CONDOR_IDS configuration macro nor the CONDOR_IDS environment variable are used. The value is given by two integers, separated by a period. For example, CONDOR_IDS = 1234.1234. If this pair is not specified in either the configuration file or in the environment, and the Condor daemons are spawned as root, then Condor will search for a condor user on the system, and run as that user's UID and GID. See section 3.6.12 on UIDs in Condor for more details.

CONDOR_ADMIN
The email address that Condor will send mail to if something goes wrong in your pool. For example, if a daemon crashes, the condor_ master can send an obituary to this address with the last few lines of that daemon's log file and a brief message that describes what signal or exit status that daemon exited with. There is no default value for CONDOR_ADMIN .

CONDOR_SUPPORT_EMAIL
The email address to be included at the bottom of all email Condor sends out under the label ``Email address of the local Condor administrator:''. This is the address where Condor users at your site should send their questions about Condor and get technical support. If this setting is not defined, Condor will use the address specified in CONDOR_ADMIN (described above).

MAIL
The full path to a mail sending program that uses -s to specify a subject for the message. On all platforms, the default shipped with Condor should work. Only if you installed things in a non-standard location on your system would you need to change this setting. There is no default value for MAIL, and the condor_ schedd will not function unless MAIL is defined.

RESERVED_SWAP
Determines how much swap space you want to reserve for your own machine. Condor will not start up more condor_ shadow processes if the amount of free swap space on your machine falls below this level. RESERVED_SWAP is specified in megabytes. The default value of RESERVED_SWAP is 5 megabytes.

RESERVED_DISK
Determines how much disk space you want to reserve for your own machine. When Condor is reporting the amount of free disk space in a given partition on your machine, it will always subtract this amount. An example is the condor_ startd, which advertises the amount of free space in the $(EXECUTE) directory. The default value of RESERVED_DISK is zero.

LOCK
Condor needs to create lock files to synchronize access to various log files. Because of problems with network file systems and file locking over the years, we highly recommend that you put these lock files on a local partition on each machine. If you do not have your $(LOCAL_DIR) on a local partition, be sure to change this entry.

Whatever user or group Condor is running as needs to have write access to this directory. If you are not running as root, this is whatever user you started up the condor_ master as. If you are running as root, and there is a condor account, it is most likely condor. Otherwise, it is whatever you set in the CONDOR_IDS environment variable, or whatever you define in the CONDOR_IDS setting in the Condor config files. See section 3.6.12 on UIDs in Condor for details.

If no value for LOCK is provided, the value of LOG is used.

HISTORY
Defines the location of the Condor history file, which stores information about all Condor jobs that have completed on a given machine. This macro is used by both the condor_ schedd which appends the information and condor_ history, the user-level program used to view the history file. This configuration macro is given the default value of $(SPOOL)/history in the default configuration. If not defined, no history file is kept.

ENABLE_HISTORY_ROTATION
If this is defined to be true, then the history file will be rotated. If it is false, then it will not be rotated, and it will grow indefinitely, to the limits allowed by the operating system. If this is not defined, it is assumed to be true. The rotated files will be stored in the same directory as the history file.

MAX_HISTORY_LOG
Defines the maximum size for the history file, in bytes. It defaults to 20MB. This parameter is only used if history file rotation is enabled.

MAX_HISTORY_ROTATIONS
When history file rotation is turned on, this controls how many backup files there are. It default to 2, which means that there may be up to three history files (two backups, plus the history file that is being currently written to). When the history file is rotated, and this rotation would cause the number of backups to be too large, the oldest file is removed.

MAX_JOB_QUEUE_LOG_ROTATIONS
The schedd periodically rotates the job queue database file in order to save disk space. This option controls how many rotated files are saved. It defaults to 1, which means there may be up to two history files (the previous one, which was rotated out of use, and the current one that is being written to). When the job queue file is rotated, and this rotation would cause the number of backups to be larger the the maximum specified, the oldest file is removed. The primary reason to save one or more rotated job queue files is if you are using Quill, and you want to ensure that Quill keeps an accurate history of all events logged in the job queue file. Quill keeps track of where it last left off when reading logged events, so when the file is rotated, Quill will resume reading from where it last left off, provided that the rotated file still exists. If Quill finds that it needs to read events from a rotated file that has been deleted, it will be forced to skip the missing events and resume reading in the next chronological job queue file that can be found. Such an event should not lead to an inconsistency in Quill's view of the current queue contents, but it would create a inconsistency in Quill's record of the history of the job queue.

DEFAULT_DOMAIN_NAME
If you do not use a fully qualified name in file /etc/hosts (or NIS, etc.) for either your official hostname or as an alias, Condor would not normally be able to use fully qualified names in places that it wants to. You can set this macro to the domain to be appended to your hostname, if changing your host information is not a good option. This macro must be set in the global configuration file (not the $(LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE). The reason for this is that the special $(FULL_HOSTNAME) macro is used by the configuration file code in Condor needs to know the full hostname. So, for $(DEFAULT_DOMAIN_NAME) to take effect, Condor must already have read in its value. However, Condor must set the $(FULL_HOSTNAME) special macro since you might use that to define where your local configuration file is. After reading the global configuration file, Condor figures out the right values for $(HOSTNAME) and $(FULL_HOSTNAME) and inserts them into its configuration table.

NO_DNS
A boolean value that defaults to False. When True, Condor constructs host names using the host's IP address together with the value defined for DEFAULT_DOMAIN_NAME.

CM_IP_ADDR
If neither COLLECTOR_HOST nor COLLECTOR_IP_ADDR macros are defined, then this macro will be used to determine the IP address of the central manager (collector daemon). This macro is defined by an IP address.

EMAIL_DOMAIN
By default, if a user does not specify notify_user in the submit description file, any email Condor sends about that job will go to "username@UID_DOMAIN". If your machines all share a common UID domain (so that you would set UID_DOMAIN to be the same across all machines in your pool), but email to user@UID_DOMAIN is not the right place for Condor to send email for your site, you can define the default domain to use for email. A common example would be to set EMAIL_DOMAIN to the fully qualified hostname of each machine in your pool, so users submitting jobs from a specific machine would get email sent to user@machine.your.domain, instead of user@your.domain. You would do this by setting EMAIL_DOMAIN to $(FULL_HOSTNAME). In general, you should leave this setting commented out unless two things are true: 1) UID_DOMAIN is set to your domain, not $(FULL_HOSTNAME), and 2) email to user@UID_DOMAIN will not work.

CREATE_CORE_FILES
Defines whether or not Condor daemons are to create a core file in the LOG directory if something really bad happens. It is used to set the resource limit for the size of a core file. If not defined, it leaves in place whatever limit was in effect when the Condor daemons (normally the condor_ master) were started. This allows Condor to inherit the default system core file generation behavior at startup. For Unix operating systems, this behavior can be inherited from the parent shell, or specified in a shell script that starts Condor. If this parameter is set and True, the limit is increased to the maximum. If it is set to False, the limit is set at 0 (which means that no core files are created). Core files greatly help the Condor developers debug any problems you might be having. By using the parameter, you do not have to worry about tracking down where in your boot scripts you need to set the core limit before starting Condor. You set the parameter to whatever behavior you want Condor to enforce. This parameter defaults to undefined to allow the initial operating system default value to take precedence, and is commented out in the default configuration file.

Q_QUERY_TIMEOUT
Defines the timeout (in seconds) that condor_ q uses when trying to connect to the condor_ schedd. Defaults to 20 seconds.
PASSWD_CACHE_REFRESH
Condor can cause NIS servers to become overwhelmed by queries for uid and group information in large pools. In order to avoid this problem, Condor caches UID and group information internally. This setting allows pool administrators to specify (in seconds) how long Condor should wait until refreshes a cache entry. The default is set to 300 seconds, or 5 minutes. This means that if a pool administrator updates the user or group database (for example, /etc/passwd or /etc/group), it can take up to 5 minutes before Condor will have the updated information. This caching feature can be disabled by setting the refresh interval to 0. In addition, the cache can also be flushed explicitly by running the command
    condor_reconfig -full
This configuration variable has no effect on Windows.
SYSAPI_GET_LOADAVG
If set to False, then Condor will not attempt to compute the load average on the system, and instead will always report the system load average to be 0.0. Defaults to True.

NETWORK_MAX_PENDING_CONNECTS
This specifies a limit to the maximum number of simultaneous network connection attempts. This is primarily relevant to condor_ schedd, which may try to connect to large numbers of startds when claiming them. The negotiator may also connect to large numbers of startds when initiating security sessions used for sending MATCH messages. On Unix, the default for this parameter is eighty percent of the process file descriptor limit. On windows, the default is 1600.


3.3.4 Daemon Logging Configuration File Entries

These entries control how and where the Condor daemons write their log files. Each of the entries in this section represents multiple macros. There is one for each subsystem (listed in section 3.3.1). The macro name for each substitutes <SUBSYS> with the name of the subsystem corresponding to the daemon.

<SUBSYS>_LOG
The name of the log file for a given subsystem. For example, $(STARTD_LOG) gives the location of the log file for condor_ startd.

The actual names of the files are also used in the $(VALID_LOG_FILES) entry used by condor_ preen. A change to one of the file names with this setting requires a change to the $(VALID_LOG_FILES) entry as well, or condor_ preen will delete your newly named log files.

MAX_<SUBSYS>_LOG
Controls the maximum length in bytes to which a log will be allowed to grow. Each log file will grow to the specified length, then be saved to a file with the suffix .old. The .old files are overwritten each time the log is saved, thus the maximum space devoted to logging for any one program will be twice the maximum length of its log file. A value of 0 specifies that the file may grow without bounds. The default is 1 Mbyte.

TRUNC_<SUBSYS>_LOG_ON_OPEN
If this macro is defined and set to True, the affected log will be truncated and started from an empty file with each invocation of the program. Otherwise, new invocations of the program will append to the previous log file. By default this setting is False for all daemons.

<SUBSYS>_LOCK
This macro specifies the lock file used to synchronize append operations to the log file for this subsystem. It must be a separate file from the $(<SUBSYS>_LOG) file, since the $(<SUBSYS>_LOG) file may be rotated and you want to be able to synchronize access across log file rotations. A lock file is only required for log files which are accessed by more than one process. Currently, this includes only the SHADOW subsystem. This macro is defined relative to the $(LOCK) macro. If, for some strange reason, you decide to change this setting, be sure to change the $(VALID_LOG_FILES) entry that condor_ preen uses as well.

FILE_LOCK_VIA_MUTEX
This macro setting only works on Win32 - it is ignored on Unix. If set to be True, then log locking is implemented via a kernel mutex instead of via file locking. On Win32, mutex access is FIFO, while obtaining a file lock is non-deterministic. Thus setting to True fixes problems on Win32 where processes (usually shadows) could starve waiting for a lock on a log file. Defaults to True on Win32, and is always False on Unix.

ENABLE_USERLOG_LOCKING
When True (the default value), a user's job log (as specified in a submit description file) will be locked before being written to. If False, Condor will not lock the file before writing.

TOUCH_LOG_INTERVAL
The time interval in seconds between when daemons touch their log files. The change in last modification time for the log file is useful when a daemon restarts after failure or shut down. The last modification date is printed, and it provides an upper bound on the length of time that the daemon was not running. Defaults to 60 seconds.

<SUBSYS>_DEBUG
All of the Condor daemons can produce different levels of output depending on how much information is desired. The various levels of verbosity for a given daemon are determined by this macro. All daemons have the default level D_ ALWAYS, and log messages for that level will be printed to the daemon's log, regardless of this macro's setting. Settings are a comma- or space-separated list of the following values:

D_ ALL
This flag turns on all debugging output by enabling all of the debug levels at once. There is no need to list any other debug levels in addition to D_ ALL; doing so would be redundant. Be warned: this will generate about a HUGE amount of output. To obtain a higher level of output than the default, consider using D_ FULLDEBUG before using this option.

D_ FULLDEBUG
This level provides verbose output of a general nature into the log files. Frequent log messages for very specific debugging purposes would be excluded. In those cases, the messages would be viewed by having that another flag and D_ FULLDEBUG both listed in the configuration file.

D_ DAEMONCORE
Provides log file entries specific to DaemonCore, such as timers the daemons have set and the commands that are registered. If both D_ FULLDEBUG and D_ DAEMONCORE are set, expect very verbose output.

D_ PRIV
This flag provides log messages about the privilege state switching that the daemons do. See section 3.6.12 on UIDs in Condor for details.

D_ COMMAND
With this flag set, any daemon that uses DaemonCore will print out a log message whenever a command comes in. The name and integer of the command, whether the command was sent via UDP or TCP, and where the command was sent from are all logged. Because the messages about the command used by condor_ kbdd to communicate with the condor_ startd whenever there is activity on the X server, and the command used for keep-alives are both only printed with D_ FULLDEBUG enabled, it is best if this setting is used for all daemons.

D_ LOAD
The condor_ startd keeps track of the load average on the machine where it is running. Both the general system load average, and the load average being generated by Condor's activity there are determined. With this flag set, the condor_ startd will log a message with the current state of both of these load averages whenever it computes them. This flag only affects the condor_ startd.

D_ KEYBOARD
With this flag set, the condor_ startd will print out a log message with the current values for remote and local keyboard idle time. This flag affects only the condor_ startd.

D_ JOB
When this flag is set, the condor_ startd will send to its log file the contents of any job ClassAd that the condor_ schedd sends to claim the condor_ startd for its use. This flag affects only the condor_ startd.

D_ MACHINE
When this flag is set, the condor_ startd will send to its log file the contents of its resource ClassAd when the condor_ schedd tries to claim the condor_ startd for its use. This flag affects only the condor_ startd.

D_ SYSCALLS
This flag is used to make the condor_ shadow log remote syscall requests and return values. This can help track down problems a user is having with a particular job by providing the system calls the job is performing. If any are failing, the reason for the failure is given. The condor_ schedd also uses this flag for the server portion of the queue management code. With D_ SYSCALLS defined in SCHEDD_DEBUG there will be verbose logging of all queue management operations the condor_ schedd performs.

D_ MATCH
When this flag is set, the condor_ negotiator logs a message for every match.

D_ NETWORK
When this flag is set, all Condor daemons will log a message on every TCP accept, connect, and close, and on every UDP send and receive. This flag is not yet fully supported in the condor_ shadow.

D_ HOSTNAME
When this flag is set, the Condor daemons and/or tools will print verbose messages explaining how they resolve host names, domain names, and IP addresses. This is useful for sites that are having trouble getting Condor to work because of problems with DNS, NIS or other host name resolving systems in use.

D_ CKPT
When this flag is set, the Condor process checkpoint support code, which is linked into a STANDARD universe user job, will output some low-level details about the checkpoint procedure into the $(SHADOW_LOG).

D_ SECURITY
This flag will enable debug messages pertaining to the setup of secure network communication, including messages for the negotiation of a socket authentication mechanism, the management of a session key cache. and messages about the authentication process itself. See section 3.6.1 for more information about secure communication configuration.

D_ PROCFAMILY
Condor often times needs to manage an entire family of processes, (that is, a process and all descendants of that process). This debug flag will turn on debugging output for the management of families of processes.

D_ ACCOUNTANT
When this flag is set, the condor_ negotiator will output debug messages relating to the computation of user priorities (see section 3.4).

D_ PROTOCOL
Enable debug messages relating to the protocol for Condor's matchmaking and resource claiming framework.

D_ PID
This flag is different from the other flags, because it is used to change the formatting of all log messages that are printed, as opposed to specifying what kinds of messages should be printed. If D_ PID is set, Condor will always print out the process identifier (PID) of the process writing each line to the log file. This is especially helpful for Condor daemons that can fork multiple helper-processes (such as the condor_ schedd or condor_ collector) so the log file will clearly show which thread of execution is generating each log message.

D_ FDS
This flag is different from the other flags, because it is used to change the formatting of all log messages that are printed, as opposed to specifying what kinds of messages should be printed. If D_ FDS is set, Condor will always print out the file descriptor that the open of the log file was allocated by the operating system. This can be helpful in debugging Condor's use of system file descriptors as it will generally track the number of file descriptors that Condor has open.

ALL_DEBUG
Used to make all subsystems share a debug flag. Set the parameter ALL_DEBUG instead of changing all of the individual parameters. For example, to turn on all debugging in all subsystems, set ALL_DEBUG = D_ALL.

TOOL_DEBUG
Uses the same values (debugging levels) as <SUBSYS>_DEBUG to describe the amount of debugging information sent to stderr for Condor tools.

SUBMIT_DEBUG
Uses the same values (debugging levels) as <SUBSYS>_DEBUG to describe the amount of debugging information sent to stderr for condor_ submit.

Log files may optionally be specified per debug level as follows:

<SUBSYS>_<LEVEL>_LOG
This is the name of a log file for messages at a specific debug level for a specific subsystem. If the debug level is included in $(<SUBSYS>_DEBUG), then all messages of this debug level will be written both to the $(<SUBSYS>_LOG) file and the $(<SUBSYS>_<LEVEL>_LOG) file. For example, $(SHADOW_SYSCALLS_LOG) specifies a log file for all remote system call debug messages.

MAX_<SUBSYS>_<LEVEL>_LOG
Similar to MAX_<SUBSYS>_LOG .

TRUNC_<SUBSYS>_<LEVEL>_LOG_ON_OPEN
Similar to TRUNC_<SUBSYS>_LOG_ON_OPEN .


3.3.5 DaemonCore Configuration File Entries

Please read section 3.9 for details on DaemonCore. There are certain configuration file settings that DaemonCore uses which affect all Condor daemons (except the checkpoint server, shadow, and starter, none of which use DaemonCore yet).

HOSTALLOW...
All macros that begin with either HOSTALLOW or HOSTDENY are settings for Condor's host-based security. See section 3.6.10 on Setting up IP/host-based security in Condor for details on these macros and how to configure them.

ENABLE_RUNTIME_CONFIG
The condor_ config_val tool has an option -rset for dynamically setting runtime configuration values (which only effect the in-memory configuration variables). Because of the potential security implications of this feature, by default, Condor daemons will not honor these requests. To use this functionality, Condor administrators must specifically enable it by setting ENABLE_RUNTIME_CONFIG to True, and specify what configuration variables can be changed using the SETTABLE_ATTRS... family of configuration options (described below). Defaults to False.

ENABLE_PERSISTENT_CONFIG
The condor_ config_val tool has a -set option for dynamically setting persistent configuration values. These values override options in the normal Condor configuration files. Because of the potential security implications of this feature, by default, Condor daemons will not honor these requests. To use this functionality, Condor administrators must specifically enable it by setting ENABLE_PERSISTENT_CONFIG to True, creating a directory where the Condor daemons will hold these dynamically-generated persistent configuration files (declared using PERSISTENT_CONFIG_DIR, described below) and specify what configuration variables can be changed using the SETTABLE_ATTRS... family of configuration options (described below). Defaults to False.

PERSISTENT_CONFIG_DIR
Directory where daemons should store dynamically-generated persistent configuration files (used to support condor_ config_val -set) This directory should only be writable by root, or the user the Condor daemons are running as (if non-root). There is no default, administrators that wish to use this functionality must create this directory and define this setting. This directory must not be shared by multiple Condor installations, though it can be shared by all Condor daemons on the same host. Keep in mind that this directory should not be placed on an NFS mount where ``root-squashing'' is in effect, or else Condor daemons running as root will not be able to write to them. A directory (only writable by root) on the local file system is usually the best location for this directory.

SETTABLE_ATTRS...
All macros that begin with SETTABLE_ATTRS or <SUBSYS>_SETTABLE_ATTRS are settings used to restrict the configuration values that can be changed using the condor_ config_val command. Section 3.6.10 on Setting up IP/Host-Based Security in Condor for details on these macros and how to configure them. In particular, section 3.6.10 on page [*] contains details specific to these macros.

SHUTDOWN_GRACEFUL_TIMEOUT
Determines how long Condor will allow daemons try their graceful shutdown methods before they do a hard shutdown. It is defined in terms of seconds. The default is 1800 (30 minutes).

<SUBSYS>_ADDRESS_FILE
A complete path to a file that is to contain an IP address and port number for a daemon. Every Condor daemon that uses DaemonCore has a command port where commands are sent. The IP/port of the daemon is put in that daemon's ClassAd, so that other machines in the pool can query the condor_ collector (which listens on a well-known port) to find the address of a given daemon on a given machine. When tools and daemons are all executing on the same single machine, communications do not require a query of the condor_ collector daemon. Instead, they look in a file on the local disk to find the IP/port. This macro causes daemons to write the IP/port of their command socket to a specified file. In this way, local tools will continue to operate, even if the machine running the condor_ collector crashes. Using this file will also generate slightly less network traffic in the pool, since tools including condor_ q and condor_ rm do not need to send any messages over the network to locate the condor_ schedd daemon. This macro is not necessary for the condor_ collector daemon, since its command socket is at a well-known port.

The macro is named by substituting <SUBSYS> with the appropriate subsystem string as defined in section 3.3.1.

<SUBSYS>_ATTRS or <SUBSYS>_EXPRS
Allows any DaemonCore daemon to advertise arbitrary expressions from the configuration file in its ClassAd. Give the comma-separated list of entries from the configuration file you want in the given daemon's ClassAd. Frequently used to add attributes to machines so that the machines can discriminate between other machines in a job's rank and requirements.

The macro is named by substituting <SUBSYS> with the appropriate subsystem string as defined in section 3.3.1.

<SUBSYS>_EXPRS is a historic setting that functions identically to <SUBSYS>_ATTRS. Use <SUBSYS>_ATTRS.

NOTE: The condor_ kbdd does not send ClassAds now, so this entry does not affect it. The condor_ startd, condor_ schedd, condor_ master, and condor_ collector do send ClassAds, so those would be valid subsystems to set this entry for.

SUBMIT_EXPRS not part of the <SUBSYS>_EXPRS, it is documented in section 3.3.15

Because of the different syntax of the configuration file and ClassAds, a little extra work is required to get a given entry into a ClassAd. In particular, ClassAds require quote marks (") around strings. Numeric values and boolean expressions can go in directly. For example, if the condor_ startd is to advertise a string macro, a numeric macro, and a boolean expression, do something similar to:

    STRING = This is a string 
    NUMBER = 666
    BOOL1 = True
    BOOL2 = CurrentTime >= $(NUMBER) || $(BOOL1)
    MY_STRING = "$(STRING)"
    STARTD_ATTRS = MY_STRING, NUMBER, BOOL1, BOOL2


3.3.6 Network-Related Configuration File Entries

More information about networking in Condor can be found in section 3.7 on page [*].

BIND_ALL_INTERFACES
For systems with multiple network interfaces, if this configuration setting is not defined, Condor binds all network sockets to first interface found, or the IP address specified with NETWORK_INTERFACE (described below). Starting with version 6.7.13, BIND_ALL_INTERFACES can be set to True to cause Condor to bind to all interfaces on the machine. However, currently Condor is still only able to advertise a single IP address, even if it is listening on multiple interfaces. By default, it will advertise the IP address of the network interface used to contact the collector, since this is the most likely to be accessible to other processes which query information from the same collector. More information about using this setting can be found in section 3.7.2 on page [*].

NETWORK_INTERFACE
For systems with multiple network interfaces, if this configuration setting is not defined, Condor binds all network sockets to first interface found. To bind to a specific network interface other than the first one, this NETWORK_INTERFACE should be set to the IP address to use. When BIND_ALL_INTERFACES is set to True, this setting simply controls what IP address a given Condor host will advertise. More information about configuring Condor on machines with multiple network interfaces can be found in section 3.7.2 on page [*].

HIGHPORT
Specifies an upper limit of given port numbers for Condor to use, such that Condor is restricted to a range of port numbers. If this macro is not explicitly specified, then Condor will not restrict the port numbers that it uses. Condor will use system-assigned port numbers. For this macro to work, both HIGHPORT and LOWPORT (given below) must be defined.

LOWPORT
Specifies a lower limit of given port numbers for Condor to use, such that Condor is restricted to a range of port numbers. If this macro is not explicitly specified, then Condor will not restrict the port numbers that it uses. Condor will use system-assigned port numbers. For this macro to work, both HIGHPORT (given above) and LOWPORT must be defined.

IN_LOWPORT
An integer value that specifies a lower limit of given port numbers for Condor to use on incoming connections (ports for listening), such that Condor is restricted to a range of port numbers. This range implies the use of both IN_LOWPORT and IN_HIGHPORT. A range of port numbers less than 1024 may be used for daemons running as root. Do not specify IN_LOWPORT in combination with IN_HIGHPORT such that the range crosses the port 1024 boundary. Applies only to Unix machine configuration. Use of IN_LOWPORT and IN_HIGHPORT overrides any definition of LOWPORT and HIGHPORT.

IN_HIGHPORT
An integer value that specifies an upper limit of given port numbers for Condor to use on incoming connections (ports for listening), such that Condor is restricted to a range of port numbers. This range implies the use of both IN_LOWPORT and IN_HIGHPORT. A range of port numbers less than 1024 may be used for daemons running as root. Do not specify IN_LOWPORT in combination with IN_HIGHPORT such that the range crosses the port 1024 boundary. Applies only to Unix machine configuration. Use of IN_LOWPORT and IN_HIGHPORT overrides any definition of LOWPORT and HIGHPORT.

OUT_LOWPORT
An integer value that specifies a lower limit of given port numbers for Condor to use on outgoing connections, such that Condor is restricted to a range of port numbers. This range implies the use of both OUT_LOWPORT and OUT_HIGHPORT. A range of port numbers less than 1024 is inappropriate, as not all daemons and tools will be run as root. Applies only to Unix machine configuration. Use of OUT_LOWPORT and OUT_HIGHPORT overrides any definition of LOWPORT and HIGHPORT.

OUT_HIGHPORT
An integer value that specifies an upper limit of given port numbers for Condor to use on outgoing connections, such that Condor is restricted to a range of port numbers. This range implies the use of both OUT_LOWPORT and OUT_HIGHPORT. A range of port numbers less than 1024 is inappropriate, as not all daemons and tools will be run as root. Applies only to Unix machine configuration. Use of OUT_LOWPORT and OUT_HIGHPORT overrides any definition of LOWPORT and HIGHPORT.

UPDATE_COLLECTOR_WITH_TCP
If your site needs to use TCP connections to send ClassAd updates to your collector (which it almost certainly does NOT), set to True to enable this feature. Please read section 3.7.4 on ``Using TCP to Send Collector Updates'' on page [*] for more details and a discussion of when this functionality is needed. At this time, this setting only affects the main condor_ collector for the site, not any sites that a condor_ schedd might flock to. If enabled, also define COLLECTOR_SOCKET_CACHE_SIZE at the central manager, so that the collector will accept TCP connections for updates, and will keep them open for reuse. Defaults to False.

TCP_UPDATE_COLLECTORS
The list of collectors which will be updated with TCP instead of UDP. Please read section 3.7.4 on ``Using TCP to Send Collector Updates'' on page [*] for more details and a discussion of when a site needs this functionality. If not defined, no collectors use TCP instead of UDP.

<SUBSYS>_TIMEOUT_MULTIPLIER
An integer value that defaults to 1. This value multiplies configured timeout values for all targeted subsystem communications, thereby increasing the time until a timeout occurs. This configuration variable is intended for use by developers for debugging purposes, where communication timeouts interfere.

NONBLOCKING_COLLECTOR_UPDATE
A boolean value that defaults to True. When True, the establishment of TCP connections to the condor_ collector daemon for a security-enabled pool are done in a nonblocking manner.

NEGOTIATOR_USE_NONBLOCKING_STARTD_CONTACT
A boolean value that defaults to True. When True, the establishment of TCP connections from the condor_ negotiator daemon to the condor_ startd daemon for a security-enabled pool are done in a nonblocking manner.

The following settings are specific to enabling Generic Connection Brokering or GCB in your Condor pool. More information about GCB and how to configure it can be found in section 3.7.3 on page [*].

NET_REMAP_ENABLE
If defined to True, this setting will enable a network remapping service for Condor. The service to use is controlled by NET_REMAP_SERVICE, described below. This boolean value defaults to False.

NET_REMAP_SERVICE
If NET_REMAP_ENABLE is defined to True, this setting controls what network remapping service should be used. Currently, the only value supported is GCB. The default is undefined.

NET_REMAP_INAGENT
Hosts with the GCB network remapping service enabled that require a GCB broker (see the section on GCB referenced above for more details) specify the IP address of their broker with this setting. The default is undefined.

NET_REMAP_ROUTE
Hosts with the GCB network remapping service enabled that would like to use a GCB routing table GCB broker (again, see the section on GCB for more details) specify The full path to their routing table with this setting. The default is undefined.


3.3.7 Shared File System Configuration File Macros

These macros control how Condor interacts with various shared and network file systems. If you are using AFS as your shared file system, be sure to read section 3.12.1 on Using Condor with AFS. For information on submitting jobs under shared file systems, see section 2.5.3.

UID_DOMAIN
The UID_DOMAIN macro is used to decide under which user to run jobs. If the $(UID_DOMAIN) on the submitting machine is different than the $(UID_DOMAIN) on the machine that runs a job, then Condor runs the job as the user nobody. For example, if the submit machine has a $(UID_DOMAIN) of flippy.cs.wisc.edu, and the machine where the job will execute has a $(UID_DOMAIN) of cs.wisc.edu, the job will run as user nobody, because the two $(UID_DOMAIN)s are not the same. If the $(UID_DOMAIN) is the same on both the submit and execute machines, then Condor will run the job as the user that submitted the job.

A further check attempts to assure that the submitting machine can not lie about its UID_DOMAIN. Condor compares the submit machine's claimed value for UID_DOMAIN to its fully qualified name. If the two do not end the same, then the submit machine is presumed to be lying about its UID_DOMAIN. In this case, Condor will run the job as user nobody. For example, a job submission to the Condor pool at the UW Madison from flippy.example.com, claiming a UID_DOMAIN of of cs.wisc.edu, will run the job as the user nobody.

Because of this verification, $(UID_DOMAIN) must be a real domain name. At the Computer Sciences department at the UW Madison, we set the $(UID_DOMAIN) to be cs.wisc.edu to indicate that whenever someone submits from a department machine, we will run the job as the user who submits it.

Also see SOFT_UID_DOMAIN below for information about one more check that Condor performs before running a job as a given user.

A few details:

An administrator could set UID_DOMAIN to *. This will match all domains, but it is a gaping security hole. It is not recommended.

An administrator can also leave UID_DOMAIN undefined. This will force Condor to always run jobs as user nobody. Running standard universe jobs as user nobody enhances security and should cause no problems, because the jobs use remote I/O to access all of their files. However, if vanilla jobs are run as user nobody, then files that need to be accessed by the job will need to be marked as world readable/writable so the user nobody can access them.

When Condor sends e-mail about a job, Condor sends the e-mail to user@$(UID_DOMAIN). If UID_DOMAIN is undefined, the e-mail is sent to user@submitmachinename.

TRUST_UID_DOMAIN
As an added security precaution when Condor is about to spawn a job, it ensures that the UID_DOMAIN of a given submit machine is a substring of that machine's fully-qualified host name. However, at some sites, there may be multiple UID spaces that do not clearly correspond to Internet domain names. In these cases, administrators may wish to use names to describe the UID domains which are not substrings of the host names of the machines. For this to work, Condor must not do this regular security check. If the TRUST_UID_DOMAIN setting is defined to True, Condor will not perform this test, and will trust whatever UID_DOMAIN is presented by the submit machine when trying to spawn a job, instead of making sure the submit machine's host name matches the UID_DOMAIN. When not defined, the default is False, since it is more secure to perform this test.

SOFT_UID_DOMAIN
A boolean variable that defaults to False when not defined. When Condor is about to run a job as a particular user (instead of as user nobody), it verifies that the UID given for the user is in the password file and actually matches the given user name. However, under installations that do not have every user in every machine's password file, this check will fail and the execution attempt will be aborted. To cause Condor not to do this check, set this configuration variable to True. Condor will then run the job under the user's UID.

VMx_USER
The name of a user for Condor to use instead of user nobody, as part of a solution that plugs a security hole whereby a lurker process can prey on a subsequent job run as user name nobody. x is an integer associated with virtual machines. On Windows, VMx_USER will only work if the credential of the specified user is stored on the execute machine using condor_ store_cred. See Section 3.6.12 for more information.

EXECUTE_LOGIN_IS_DEDICATED
A boolean value that defaults to False. When True, Condor knows that users given by the VMx_USER configuration variable exist exclusively to be the owner of Condor jobs. When a Condor job belonging to one of these users completes, Condor may use kill all jobs belonging to this user. This avoids lurker jobs that the Condor job may have started.

FILESYSTEM_DOMAIN
The FILESYSTEM_DOMAIN macro is an arbitrary string that is used to decide if two machines (a submitting machine and an execute machine) share a file system. Although the macro name contains the word ``DOMAIN'', the macro is not required to be a domain name. It often is a domain name.

Note that this implementation is not ideal: machines may share some file systems but not others. Condor currently has no way to express this automatically. You can express the need to use a particular file system by adding additional attributes to your machines and submit files, similar to the example given in Frequently Asked Questions, section 7 on how to run jobs only on machines that have certain software packages.

Note that if you do not set $(FILESYSTEM_DOMAIN), Condor defaults to setting the macro's value to be the fully qualified hostname of the local machine. Since each machine will have a different $(FILESYSTEM_DOMAIN), they will not be considered to have shared file systems.

RESERVE_AFS_CACHE
If your machine is running AFS and the AFS cache lives on the same partition as the other Condor directories, and you want Condor to reserve the space that your AFS cache is configured to use, set this macro to True. It defaults to False.

USE_NFS
This macro influences how Condor jobs running in the standard universe access their files. Condor will redirect the file I/O requests of standard universe jobs to be executed on the machine which submitted the job. Because of this, as a Condor job migrates around the network, the file system always appears to be identical to the file system where the job was submitted. However, consider the case where a user's data files are sitting on an NFS server. The machine running the user's program will send all I/O over the network to the machine which submitted the job, which in turn sends all the I/O over the network a second time back to the NFS file server. Thus, all of the program's I/O is being sent over the network twice.

If this macro to True, then Condor will attempt to read/write files without redirecting I/O back to the submitting machine if both the submitting machine and the machine running the job are both accessing the same NFS servers (if they are both in the same $(FILESYSTEM_DOMAIN) and in the same $(UID_DOMAIN), as described above). The result is I/O performed by Condor standard universe jobs is only sent over the network once. While sending all file operations over the network twice might sound really bad, unless you are operating over networks where bandwidth as at a very high premium, practical experience reveals that this scheme offers very little real performance gain. There are also some (fairly rare) situations where this scheme can break down.

Setting $(USE_NFS) to False is always safe. It may result in slightly more network traffic, but Condor jobs are most often heavy on CPU and light on I/O. It also ensures that a remote standard universe Condor job will always use Condor's remote system calls mechanism to reroute I/O and therefore see the exact same file system that the user sees on the machine where she/he submitted the job.

Some gritty details for folks who want to know: If the you set $(USE_NFS) to True, and the $(FILESYSTEM_DOMAIN) of both the submitting machine and the remote machine about to execute the job match, and the $(FILESYSTEM_DOMAIN) claimed by the submit machine is indeed found to be a subset of what an inverse lookup to a DNS (domain name server) reports as the fully qualified domain name for the submit machine's IP address (this security measure safeguards against the submit machine from lying), then the job will access files using a local system call, without redirecting them to the submitting machine (with NFS). Otherwise, the system call will get routed back to the submitting machine using Condor's remote system call mechanism. NOTE: When submitting a vanilla job, condor_ submit will, by default, append requirements to the Job ClassAd that specify the machine to run the job must be in the same $(FILESYSTEM_DOMAIN) and the same $(UID_DOMAIN).

IGNORE_NFS_LOCK_ERRORS
When set to True, all errors related to file locking errors from NFS are ignored. Defaults to False, not ignoring errors.

USE_AFS
If your machines have AFS, this macro determines whether Condor will use remote system calls for standard universe jobs to send I/O requests to the submit machine, or if it should use local file access on the execute machine (which will then use AFS to get to the submitter's files). Read the setting above on $(USE_NFS) for a discussion of why you might want to use AFS access instead of remote system calls.

One important difference between $(USE_NFS) and $(USE_AFS) is the AFS cache. With $(USE_AFS) set to True, the remote Condor job executing on some machine will start modifying the AFS cache, possibly evicting the machine owner's files from the cache to make room for its own. Generally speaking, since we try to minimize the impact of having a Condor job run on a given machine, we do not recommend using this setting.

While sending all file operations over the network twice might sound really bad, unless you are operating over networks where bandwidth as at a very high premium, practical experience reveals that this scheme offers very little real performance gain. There are also some (fairly rare) situations where this scheme can break down.

Setting $(USE_AFS) to False is always safe. It may result in slightly more network traffic, but Condor jobs are usually heavy on CPU and light on I/O. False ensures that a remote standard universe Condor job will always see the exact same file system that the user on sees on the machine where he/she submitted the job. Plus, it will ensure that the machine where the job executes does not have its AFS cache modified as a result of the Condor job being there.

However, things may be different at your site, which is why the setting is there.


3.3.8 Checkpoint Server Configuration File Macros

These macros control whether or not Condor uses a checkpoint server. If you are using a checkpoint server, this section describes the settings that the checkpoint server itself needs defined. A checkpoint server is installed separately. It is not included in the main Condor binary distribution or installation procedure. See section 3.8 on Installing a Checkpoint Server for details on installing and running a checkpoint server for your pool.

NOTE: If you are setting up a machine to join the UW-Madison CS Department Condor pool, you should configure the machine to use a checkpoint server, and use ``condor-ckpt.cs.wisc.edu'' as the checkpoint server host (see below).

CKPT_SERVER_HOST
The hostname of a checkpoint server.

STARTER_CHOOSES_CKPT_SERVER
If this parameter is True or undefined on the submit machine, the checkpoint server specified by $(CKPT_SERVER_HOST) on the execute machine is used. If it is False on the submit machine, the checkpoint server specified by $(CKPT_SERVER_HOST) on the submit machine is used.

CKPT_SERVER_DIR
The checkpoint server needs this macro defined to the full path of the directory the server should use to store checkpoint files. Depending on the size of your pool and the size of the jobs your users are submitting, this directory (and its subdirectories) might need to store many Mbytes of data.

USE_CKPT_SERVER
A boolean which determines if you want a given submit machine to use a checkpoint server if one is available. If a checkpoint server isn't available or USE_CKPT_SERVER is set to False, checkpoints will be written to the local $(SPOOL) directory on the submission machine.

MAX_DISCARDED_RUN_TIME
If the shadow is unable to read a checkpoint file from the checkpoint server, it keeps trying only if the job has accumulated more than this many seconds of CPU usage. Otherwise, the job is started from scratch. Defaults to 3600 (1 hour). This setting is only used if $(USE_CKPT_SERVER) is True.


3.3.9 condor_ master Configuration File Macros

These macros control the condor_ master.

DAEMON_LIST
This macro determines what daemons the condor_ master will start and keep its watchful eyes on. The list is a comma or space separated list of subsystem names (listed in section 3.3.1). For example,
    DAEMON_LIST = MASTER, STARTD, SCHEDD

NOTE: This configuration variable cannot be changed by using condor_ reconfig or by sending a SIGHUP. To change this configuration variable, restart the condor_ master daemon by using condor_ restart. Only then will the change take effect.

NOTE: On your central manager, your $(DAEMON_LIST) will be different from your regular pool, since it will include entries for the condor_ collector and condor_ negotiator.

NOTE: On machines running Digital Unix, your $(DAEMON_LIST) will also include KBDD, for the condor_ kbdd, which is a special daemon that runs to monitor keyboard and mouse activity on the console. It is only with this special daemon that we can acquire this information on those platforms.

DC_DAEMON_LIST
This macro lists the daemons in DAEMON_LIST which use the Condor DaemonCore library. The condor_ master must differentiate between daemons that use DaemonCore and those that don't so it uses the appropriate inter-process communication mechanisms. This list currently includes all Condor daemons except the checkpoint server by default.

<SUBSYS>
Once you have defined which subsystems you want the condor_ master to start, you must provide it with the full path to each of these binaries. For example:
    MASTER          = $(SBIN)/condor_master
    STARTD          = $(SBIN)/condor_startd
    SCHEDD          = $(SBIN)/condor_schedd
These are most often defined relative to the $(SBIN) macro.

The macro is named by substituting <SUBSYS> with the appropriate subsystem string as defined in section 3.3.1.

DAEMONNAME_ENVIRONMENT
For each subsystem defined in DAEMON_LIST, you may specify changes to the environment that daemon is started with by setting DAEMONNAME_ENVIRONMENT, where DAEMONNAME is the name of a daemon listed in DAEMON_LIST. It should use the same syntax for specifying the environment as the environment specification in a condor_ submit file (see page [*]). For example, if you wish to redefine the TMP and CONDOR_CONFIG environment variables seen by the condor_ schedd, you could place the following in the config file:
    SCHEDD_ENVIRONMENT = "TMP=/new/value CONDOR_CONFIG=/special/config"
When the condor_ schedd was started by the condor_ master, it would see the specified values of TMP and CONDOR_CONFIG.

<SUBSYS>_ARGS
This macro allows the specification of additional command line arguments for any process spawned by the condor_ master. List the desired arguments using the same syntax as the arguments specification in a condor_ submit submit file (see page [*]), with one exception: do not escape double-quotes when using the old-style syntax (this is for backward compatibility). Set the arguments for a specific daemon with this macro, and the macro will affect only that daemon. Define one of these for each daemon the condor_ master is controlling. For example, set $(STARTD_ARGS) to specify any extra command line arguments to the condor_ startd.

The macro is named by substituting <SUBSYS> with the appropriate subsystem string as defined in section 3.3.1.

PREEN
In addition to the daemons defined in $(DAEMON_LIST), the condor_ master also starts up a special process, condor_ preen to clean out junk files that have been left laying around by Condor. This macro determines where the condor_ master finds the condor_ preen binary. Comment out this macro, and condor_ preen will not run.

PREEN_ARGS
Controls how condor_ preen behaves by allowing the specification of command-line arguments. This macro works as $(<SUBSYS>_ARGS) does. The difference is that you must specify this macro for condor_ preen if you want it to do anything. condor_ preen takes action only because of command line arguments. -m means you want e-mail about files condor_ preen finds that it thinks it should remove. -r means you want condor_ preen to actually remove these files.

PREEN_INTERVAL
This macro determines how often condor_ preen should be started. It is defined in terms of seconds and defaults to 86400 (once a day).

PUBLISH_OBITUARIES
When a daemon crashes, the condor_ master can send e-mail to the address specified by $(CONDOR_ADMIN) with an obituary letting the administrator know that the daemon died, the cause of death (which signal or exit status it exited with), and (optionally) the last few entries from that daemon's log file. If you want obituaries, set this macro to True.

OBITUARY_LOG_LENGTH
This macro controls how many lines of the log file are part of obituaries. This macro has a default value of 20 lines.

START_MASTER
If this setting is defined and set to False when the condor_ master starts up, the first thing it will do is exit. This appears strange, but perhaps you do not want Condor to run on certain machines in your pool, yet the boot scripts for your entire pool are handled by a centralized This is an entry you would most likely find in a local configuration file, not a global configuration file.

START_DAEMONS
This macro is similar to the $(START_MASTER) macro described above. However, the condor_ master does not exit; it does not start any of the daemons listed in the $(DAEMON_LIST). The daemons may be started at a later time with a condor_ on command.

MASTER_UPDATE_INTERVAL
This macro determines how often the condor_ master sends a ClassAd update to the condor_ collector. It is defined in seconds and defaults to 300 (every 5 minutes).

MASTER_CHECK_NEW_EXEC_INTERVAL
This macro controls how often the condor_ master checks the timestamps of the running daemons. If any daemons have been modified, the master restarts them. It is defined in seconds and defaults to 300 (every 5 minutes).

MASTER_NEW_BINARY_DELAY
Once the condor_ master has discovered a new binary, this macro controls how long it waits before attempting to execute the new binary. This delay exists because the condor_ master might notice a new binary while it is in the process of being copied, in which case trying to execute it yields unpredictable results. The entry is defined in seconds and defaults to 120 (2 minutes).

SHUTDOWN_FAST_TIMEOUT
This macro determines the maximum amount of time daemons are given to perform their fast shutdown procedure before the condor_ master kills them outright. It is defined in seconds and defaults to 300 (5 minutes).

MASTER_BACKOFF_CONSTANT and MASTER_<name>_BACKOFF_CONSTANT
When a daemon crashes, condor_ master uses an exponential back off delay before restarting it; see the discussion at the end of this section for a detailed discussion on how these parameters work together. These settings define the constant value of the expression used to determine how long to wait before starting the daemon again (and, effectively becomes the initial backoff time). It is an integer in units of seconds, and defaults to 9 seconds.

$(MASTER_<name>_BACKOFF_CONSTANT) is the daemon-specific form of MASTER_BACKOFF_CONSTANT; if this daemon-specific macro is not defined for a specific daemon, the non-daemon-specific value will used.

MASTER_BACKOFF_FACTOR and MASTER_<name>_BACKOFF_FACTOR
When a daemon crashes, condor_ master uses an exponential back off delay before restarting it; see the discussion at the end of this section for a detailed discussion on how these parameters work together. This setting is the base of the exponent used to determine how long to wait before starting the daemon again. It defaults to 2 seconds.

$(MASTER_<name>_BACKOFF_FACTOR) is the daemon-specific form of MASTER_BACKOFF_FACTOR; if this daemon-specific macro is not defined for a specific daemon, the non-daemon-specific value will used.

MASTER_BACKOFF_CEILING and MASTER_<name>_BACKOFF_CEILING
When a daemon crashes, condor_ master uses an exponential back off delay before restarting it; see the discussion at the end of this section for a detailed discussion on how these parameters work together. This entry determines the maximum amount of time you want the master to wait between attempts to start a given daemon. (With 2.0 as the $(MASTER_BACKOFF_FACTOR), 1 hour is obtained in 12 restarts). It is defined in terms of seconds and defaults to 3600 (1 hour).

$(MASTER_<name>_BACKOFF_CEILING) is the daemon-specific form of MASTER_BACKOFF_CEILING; if this daemon-specific macro is not defined for a specific daemon, the non-daemon-specific value will used.

MASTER_RECOVER_FACTOR and MASTER_<name>_RECOVER_FACTOR
A macro to set how long a daemon needs to run without crashing before it is considered recovered. Once a daemon has recovered, the number of restarts is reset, so the exponential back off returns to its initial state. The macro is defined in terms of seconds and defaults to 300 (5 minutes).

$(MASTER_<name>_RECOVER_FACTOR) is the daemon-specific form of MASTER_RECOVER_FACTOR; if this daemon-specific macro is not defined for a specific daemon, the non-daemon-specific value will used.

When a daemon crashes, condor_ master will restart the daemon after a delay (a back off). The length of this delay is based on how many times it has been restarted, and gets larger after each crashes. The equation for calculating this backoff time is given by:

t = c + kn

where t is the calculated time, c is the constant defined by $(MASTER_BACKOFF_CONSTANT), k is the ``factor'' defined by $(MASTER_BACKOFF_FACTOR), and n is the number of restarts already attempted (0 for the first restart, 1 for the next, etc.).

With default values, after the first crash, the delay would be t = 9 + 2.00, giving 10 seconds (remember, n = 0). If the daemon keeps crashing, the delay increases.

For example, take the $(MASTER_BACKOFF_FACTOR) (which defaults to 2.0) to the power the number of times the daemon has restarted, and add $(MASTER_BACKOFF_CONSTANT) (which defaults to 9). Thus:

1st crash: n = 0, so: $t = 9 + 2^0 = 9 + 1 = 10\ seconds$

2nd crash: n = 1, so: $t = 9 + 2^1 = 9 + 2 = 11\ seconds$

3rd crash: n = 2, so: $t = 9 + 2^2 = 9 + 4 = 13\ seconds$

...

6th crash: n = 5, so: $t = 9 + 2^5 = 9 + 32 = 41\ seconds$

...

9th crash: n = 8, so: $t = 9 + 2^8 = 9 + 256 = 265\ seconds$

And, after the 13 crashes, it would be:

13th crash: n = 12, so: $t = 9 + 2^{12} = 9 + 4096 = 4105\ seconds$

This is bigger than the $(MASTER_BACKOFF_CEILING), which defaults to 3600, so the daemon would really be restarted after only 3600 seconds, not 4105. The condor_ master tries again every hour (since the numbers would get larger and would always be capped by the ceiling). Eventually, imagine that daemon finally started and did not crash. This might happen if, for example, an administrator reinstalled an accidentally deleted binary after receiving e-mail about the daemon crashing. If it stayed alive for $(MASTER_RECOVER_FACTOR) seconds (defaults to 5 minutes), the count of how many restarts this daemon has performed is reset to 0.

The moral of the example is that the defaults work quite well, and you probably will not want to change them for any reason.

MASTER_NAME
Defines a unique name given for a condor_ master daemon on a machine. Defaults to the fully qualified host name. If more than one condor_ master is running on the same host (for example, because of multiple Personal Condor installations running as different users) the MASTER_NAME for each condor_ master should be defined to uniquely identify the separate daemons.

If the MASTER_NAME contains more than a host name, it must have the form identifying-string@full.host.name. If the string specified with MASTER_NAME already includes an @ sign, Condor will replace whatever follows the @ sign with the fully qualified host name of the local machine. If the string does not include an @ sign, Condor will append one, followed by the host name. The identifying-string portion can contain any alphanumeric ASCII characters or punctuation marks except @ (which is used to delimit the name from the host name). We recommend that the string does not contain the : character, since that might cause problems with certain tools. In the example of many Personal Condor installations on the same host, the user name that each condor_ master is executing as is, by convention, the identifying-string. This is easily accomplished by setting MASTER_NAME = $(USERNAME) in the configuration file.

If the MASTER_NAME setting is used, and the condor_ master is configured to spawn a condor_ schedd, the name defined with MASTER_NAME takes precedence over the SCHEDD_NAME setting (see section 3.3.11 on page [*]). Since Condor makes the assumption that there is only one instance of the condor_ startd running on a machine, the MASTER_NAME is not automatically propagated to the condor_ startd. However, in situations where multiple condor_ startd daemons are running on the same host (for example, when using condor_ glidein), the STARTD_NAME should be set to uniquely identify the condor_ startd daemons (this is done automatically in the case of condor_ glidein).

If a Condor daemon (master, schedd or startd) has been given a unique name, all Condor tools that need to contact that daemon can be told what name to use via the -name command-line option.

MASTER_ATTRS
This macro is described in section 3.3.5 as <SUBSYS>_ATTRS.

MASTER_DEBUG
This macro is described in section 3.3.4 as <SUBSYS>_DEBUG.

MASTER_ADDRESS_FILE
This macro is described in section 3.3.5 as <SUBSYS>_ADDRESS_FILE.

SECONDARY_COLLECTOR_LIST
This macro lists the host names of secondary collectors. A secondary collector is a machine running a condor_ collector daemon that is not the central manager. A secondary collector makes it possible to execute administrative commands in the pool when the central manager is down by using the -pool argument to specify the name of a secondary collector to use to locate the condor_ master daemon.

ALLOW_ADMIN_COMMANDS
If set to NO for a given host, this macro disables administrative commands, such as condor_ restart, condor_ on, and condor_ off, to that host.

MASTER_INSTANCE_LOCK
Defines the name of a file for the condor_ master daemon to lock in order to prevent multiple condor_ masters from starting. This is useful when using shared file systems like NFS which do not technically support locking in the case where the lock files reside on a local disk. If this macro is not defined, the default file name will be $(LOCK)/InstanceLock. $(LOCK) can instead be defined to specify the location of all lock files, not just the condor_ master's InstanceLock. If $(LOCK) is undefined, then the master log itself is locked.

ADD_WINDOWS_FIREWALL_EXCEPTION
When set to False, the condor_ master will not automatically add Condor to the Windows Firewall list of trusted applications. Such trusted applications can accept incoming connections without interference from the firewall. This only affects machines running Windows XP SP2 or higher. The default is True.

WINDOWS_FIREWALL_FAILURE_RETRY
An integer value (default value is 60) that represents the number of times the condor_ master will retry to add firewall exceptions. When a Windows machine boots up, Condor starts up by default as well. Under certain conditions, the condor_ master may have difficulty adding exceptions to the Windows Firewall because of a delay in other services starting up. Examples of services that may possibly be slow are the SharedAccess service, the Netman service, or the Workstation service. This configuration variable allows administrators to set the number of times (once every 10 seconds) that the condor_ master will retry to add firewall exceptions. A value of 0 means that Condor will retry indefinitely.


3.3.10 condor_ startd Configuration File Macros

NOTE: If you are running Condor on a multi-CPU machine, be sure to also read section 3.12.7 on page [*] which describes how to set up and configure Condor on SMP machines.

These settings control general operation of the condor_ startd. Examples using these configuration macros, as well as further explanation is found in section 3.5 on Configuring The Startd Policy.

START
A boolean expression that, when True, indicates that the machine is willing to start running a Condor job. START is considered when the condor_ negotiator daemon is considering evicting the job to replace it with one that will generate a better rank for the condor_ startd daemon, or a user with a higher priority.

SUSPEND
A boolean expression that, when True, causes Condor to suspend running a Condor job. The machine may still be claimed, but the job makes no further progress, and Condor does not generate a load on the machine.

PREEMPT
A boolean expression that, when True, causes Condor to stop a currently running job.

CONTINUE
A boolean expression that, when True, causes Condor to continue the execution of a suspended job.

KILL
A boolean expression that, when True, causes Condor to immediately stop the execution of a currently running job, without delay, and without taking the time to produce a checkpoint (for a standard universe job).

RANK
A floating point value that Condor uses to compare potential jobs. A larger value for a specific job ranks that job above others with lower values for RANK.

IS_VALID_CHECKPOINT_PLATFORM
A boolean expression that is logically anded with the with the START expression to limit which machines a standard universe job may continue execution on once they have produced a checkpoint. The default expression is

   IS_VALID_CHECKPOINT_PLATFORM =
   (
     ( (TARGET.JobUniverse == 1) == FALSE) ||
   
     (
       (MY.CheckpointPlatform =!= UNDEFINED) &&
       (
         (TARGET.LastCheckpointPlatform =?= MY.CheckpointPlatform) ||
         (TARGET.NumCkpts == 0)
       )
     )
   )

WANT_SUSPEND
A boolean expression that, when True, tells Condor to evaluate the SUSPEND expression.

WANT_VACATE
A boolean expression that, when True, defines that a preempted Condor job is to be vacated, instead of killed.

IS_OWNER
A boolean expression that defaults to being defined as
        IS_OWNER = (START =?= FALSE)
Used to describe the state of the machine with respect to its use by its owner. Job ClassAd attributes are not used in defining IS_OWNER, as they would be Undefined.

STARTER
This macro holds the full path to the condor_ starter binary that the condor_ startd should spawn. It is normally defined relative to $(SBIN).

ALTERNATE_STARTER_1
This macro holds the full path to the condor_ starter.pvm binary that the condor_ startd spawns to service PVM jobs. It is normally defined relative to $(SBIN), since by default, condor_ starter.pvm is installed in the regular Condor release directory.

POLLING_INTERVAL
When a condor_ startd enters the claimed state, this macro determines how often the state of the machine is polled to check the need to suspend, resume, vacate or kill the job. It is defined in terms of seconds and defaults to 5.

UPDATE_INTERVAL
Determines how often the condor_ startd should send a ClassAd update to the condor_ collector. The condor_ startd also sends update on any state or activity change, or if the value of its START expression changes. See section 3.5.6 on condor_ startd states, section 3.5.7 on condor_ startd Activities, and section 3.5.3 on condor_ startd START expression for details on states, activities, and the START expression. This macro is defined in terms of seconds and defaults to 300 (5 minutes).

MAXJOBRETIREMENTTIME
An integer value representing the number of seconds a preempted job will be allowed to run before being evicted. The default value of 0 (when the configuration variable is not present) implements the expected policy that there is no retirement time. See MAXJOBRETIREMENTTIME in section 3.5.9 for further explanation.

CLAIM_WORKLIFE
If provided, this expression specifies the number of seconds during which a claim will continue accepting new jobs. Once this time expires, any existing job may continue to run as usual, but once it finishes or is preempted, the claim is closed. This may be useful if you want to force periodic renegotiation of resources without preemption having to occur. For example, if you have some low-priority jobs which should never be interrupted with kill signals, you could prevent them from being killed with MaxJobRetirementTime, but now high-priority jobs may have to wait in line when they match to a machine that is busy running one of these uninterruptible jobs. You can prevent the high-priority jobs from ever matching to such a machine by using a rank expression in the job or in the negotiator's rank expressions, but then the low-priority claim will never be interrupted; it can keep running more jobs. The solution is to use CLAIM_WORKLIFE to force the claim to stop running additional jobs after a certain amount of time. The default value for CLAIM_WORKLIFE is -1, which is treated as an infinite claim worklife, so claims may be held indefinitely (as long as they are not preempted and the schedd does not relinquish them, of course).

MAX_CLAIM_ALIVES_MISSED
The condor_ schedd sends periodic updates to each condor_ startd as a keep alive (see the description of ALIVE_INTERVAL on page [*]). If the condor_ startd does not receive any keep alive messages, it assumes that something has gone wrong with the condor_ schedd and that the resource is not being effectively used. Once this happens, the condor_ startd considers the claim to have timed out, it releases the claim, and starts advertising itself as available for other jobs. Because these keep alive messages are sent via UDP, they are sometimes dropped by the network. Therefore, the condor_ startd has some tolerance for missed keep alive messages, so that in case a few keep alives are lost, the condor_ startd will not immediately release the claim. This setting controls how many keep alive messages can be missed before the condor_ startd considers the claim no longer valid. The default is 6.

STARTD_HAS_BAD_UTMP
When the condor_ startd is computing the idle time of all the users of the machine (both local and remote), it checks the utmp file to find all the currently active ttys, and only checks access time of the devices associated with active logins. Unfortunately, on some systems, utmp is unreliable, and the condor_ startd might miss keyboard activity by doing this. So, if your utmp is unreliable, set this macro to True and the condor_ startd will check the access time on all tty and pty devices.

CONSOLE_DEVICES
This macro allows the condor_ startd to monitor console (keyboard and mouse) activity by checking the access times on special files in /dev. Activity on these files shows up as ConsoleIdle time in the condor_ startd's ClassAd. Give a comma-separated list of the names of devices considered the console, without the /dev/ portion of the pathname. The defaults vary from platform to platform, and are usually correct.

One possible exception to this is on Linux, where we use ``mouse'' as one of the entries. Most Linux installations put in a soft link from /dev/mouse that points to the appropriate device (for example, /dev/psaux for a PS/2 bus mouse, or /dev/tty00 for a serial mouse connected to com1). However, if your installation does not have this soft link, you will either need to put it in (you will be glad you did), or change this macro to point to the right device.

Unfortunately, there are no such devices on Digital Unix (don't be fooled by /dev/keyboard0; the kernel does not update the access times on these devices), so this macro is not useful in these cases, and we must use the condor_ kbdd to get this information by connecting to the X server.

STARTD_JOB_EXPRS
When the machine is claimed by a remote user, the condor_ startd can also advertise arbitrary attributes from the job ClassAd in the machine ClassAd. List the attribute names to be advertised. NOTE: Since these are already ClassAd expressions, do not do anything unusual with strings. This setting defaults to ``JobUniverse''.

STARTD_ATTRS
This macro is described in section 3.3.5 as <SUBSYS>_ATTRS.

STARTD_DEBUG
This macro (and other settings related to debug logging in the condor_ startd) is described in section 3.3.4 as <SUBSYS>_DEBUG.

STARTD_ADDRESS_FILE
This macro is described in section 3.3.5 as <SUBSYS>_ADDRESS_FILE

STARTD_SHOULD_WRITE_CLAIM_ID_FILE
Starting with version 6.7.10, the condor_ startd can be configured to write out the ClaimId for the next available claim on all virtual machines to separate files. This boolean attribute controls whether the condor_ startd should write these files. The default value is true.

STARTD_CLAIM_ID_FILE
This macro controls what file names are used if the above STARTD_SHOULD_WRITE_CLAIM_ID_FILE is true. By default, Condor will write the ClaimId into a file in the $(LOG) directory called .startd_claim_id.vmX, where X is the value of VirtualMachineID, the integer that identifies a given virtual machine on the system, or 1 on a single-VM machine. If you define your own value for this setting, you should provide a full path, and Condor will automatically append the .vmX portion of the file name.

NUM_CPUS
This macro can be used to ``lie'' to the condor_ startd about how many CPUs your machine has. If you set this, it will override Condor's automatic computation of the number of CPUs in your machine, and Condor will use whatever integer you specify here. In this way, you can allow multiple Condor jobs to run on a single-CPU machine by having that machine treated like an SMP machine with multiple CPUs, which could have different Condor jobs running on each one. Or, you can have an SMP machine advertise more virtual machines than it has CPUs. However, using this parameter will hurt the performance of the jobs, since you would now have multiple jobs running on the same CPU, competing with each other. The option is only meant for people who specifically want this behavior and know what they are doing. It is disabled by default.

NOTE: This setting cannot be changed with a simple reconfig (either by sending a SIGHUP or using condor_ reconfig. If you change this, you must restart the condor_ startd for the change to take effect (by using ``condor_ restart -startd'').

NOTE: If you use this setting on a given machine, you should probably advertise that fact in the machine's ClassAd by using the STARTD_ATTRS setting (described above). This way, jobs submitted in your pool could specify that they did or did not want to be matched with machines that were only really offering ``fractional CPUs''.

MAX_NUM_CPUS
This macro will cap the number of CPUs detected by Condor on a machine. If you set NUM_CPUS this cap is ignored. If it is set to zero, there is no cap. If it is not defined in the config file, it defaults to zero and there is no cap.

NOTE: This setting cannot be changed with a simple reconfig (either by sending a SIGHUP or using condor_ reconfig. If you change this, you must restart the condor_ startd for the change to take effect (by using ``condor_ restart -startd'').

COUNT_HYPERTHREAD_CPUS
This macro controls how Condor sees hyper threaded processors. When set to True (the default), it includes virtual CPUs in the default value of NUM_CPUS. On dedicated cluster nodes, counting virtual CPUs can sometimes improve total throughput at the expense of individual job speed. However, counting them on desktop workstations can interfere with interactive job performance.

MEMORY
Normally, Condor will automatically detect the amount of physical memory available on your machine. Define MEMORY to tell Condor how much physical memory (in MB) your machine has, overriding the value Condor computes automatically.

RESERVED_MEMORY
How much memory would you like reserved from Condor? By default, Condor considers all the physical memory of your machine as available to be used by Condor jobs. If RESERVED_MEMORY is defined, Condor subtracts it from the amount of memory it advertises as available.

STARTD_NAME
Used to give an alternative name in the condor_ startd's class ad. This esoteric configuration macro might be used in the situation where there are two condor_ startd daemons running on one machine, and each reports to the same condor_ collector. Different names will distinguish the two daemons. See the description of MASTER_NAME in section 3.3.9 on page [*] for a description of valid Condor daemon names.

RUNBENCHMARKS
Specifies when to run benchmarks. When the machine is in the Unclaimed state and this expression evaluates to True, benchmarks will be run. If RunBenchmarks is specified and set to anything other than False, additional benchmarks will be run when the condor_ startd initially starts. To disable startup benchmarks, set RunBenchmarks to False, or comment it out of the configuration file.

DedicatedScheduler
A string that identifies the dedicated scheduler. See section 3.12.8 on page [*] for details.

STARTD_NOCLAIM_SHUTDOWN
The number of seconds to run without receiving a claim before shutting Condor down on this machine. Defaults to unset, which means to never shut down. This is primarily intended for condor_ glidein. Use in other situations is not recommended.

These macros control if the condor_ startd daemon should perform backfill computations whenever resources would otherwise be idle. See section 3.12.9 on page [*] on Configuring Condor for Running Backfill Jobs for details.

ENABLE_BACKFILL
A boolean value that, when True, indicates that the machine is willing to perform backfill computations when it would otherwise be idle. This is not a policy expression that is evaluated, it is a simple True or False. This setting controls if any of the other backfill-related expressions should be evaluated. The default is False.

BACKFILL_SYSTEM
A string that defines what backfill system to use for spawning and managing backfill computations. Currently, the only supported value for this is "BOINC", which stands for the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing. See http://boinc.berkeley.edu for more information about BOINC. There is no default value, administrators must define this.

START_BACKFILL
A boolean expression that is evaluated whenever a Condor resource is in the Unclaimed/Idle state and the ENABLE_BACKFILL expression is True. If START_BACKFILL evaluates to True, the machine will enter the Backfill state and attempt to spawn a backfill computation. This expression is analogous to the START expression that controls when a Condor resource is available to run normal Condor jobs. The default value is False (which means do not spawn a backfill job even if the machine is idle and ENABLE_BACKFILL expression is True). For more information about policy expressions and the Backfill state, see section 3.5 beginning on page [*], especially sections 3.5.6, 3.5.7, and 3.5.8.

EVICT_BACKFILL
A boolean expression that is evaluated whenever a Condor resource is in the Backfill state which, when True, indicates the machine should immediately kill the currently running backfill computation and return to the Owner state. This expression is a way for administrators to define a policy where interactive users on a machine will cause backfill jobs to be removed. The default value is False. For more information about policy expressions and the Backfill state, see section 3.5 beginning on page [*], especially sections 3.5.6, 3.5.7, and 3.5.8.

These macros only apply to the condor_ startd daemon when it is running on an SMP machine. See section 3.12.7 on page [*] on Configuring The Startd for SMP Machines for details.

STARTD_RESOURCE_PREFIX
A string which specifies what prefix to give the unique Condor resources that are advertised on SMP machines. Currently, Condor uses the term virtual machine to describe these resources, so the default value for this setting is ``vm''. However, to avoid confusion with other kinds of virtual machines (the ones created using tools like VMware or Xen), in a future version of Condor, the current virtual machine terminology will change. To aid in the transition to the new terms (and to provide a means for sites that want to keep using ``vm'' even after the default has changed), this setting enables sites to define what string the condor_ startd will use to name the individual resources on an SMP machine.

VIRTUAL_MACHINES_CONNECTED_TO_CONSOLE
An integer which indicates how many of the virtual machines the condor_ startd is representing should be "connected" to the console (in other words, notice when there's console activity). This defaults to all virtual machines (N in a machine with N CPUs).

VIRTUAL_MACHINES_CONNECTED_TO_KEYBOARD
An integer which indicates how many of the virtual machines the condor_ startd is representing should be "connected" to the keyboard (for remote tty activity, as well as console activity). Defaults to 1.

DISCONNECTED_KEYBOARD_IDLE_BOOST
If there are virtual machines not connected to either the keyboard or the console, the corresponding idle time reported will be the time since the condor_ startd was spawned, plus the value of this macro. It defaults to 1200 seconds (20 minutes). We do this because if the virtual machine is configured not to care about keyboard activity, we want it to be available to Condor jobs as soon as the condor_ startd starts up, instead of having to wait for 15 minutes or more (which is the default time a machine must be idle before Condor will start a job). If you do not want this boost, set the value to 0. If you change your START expression to require more than 15 minutes before a job starts, but you still want jobs to start right away on some of your SMP nodes, increase this macro's value.

STARTD_VM_EXPRS
The list of ClassAd attribute names that should be shared across all virtual machines on the same machine. For each attribute in the list, the attribute's value is taken from each virtual machine's machine ClassAd and placed into the machine ClassAd of all the other virtual machines within the machine. For example, if the configuration file for a 2-VM machine contains
        STARTD_VM_EXPRS = State, Activity, EnteredCurrentActivity
then the machine ClassAd for both virtual machines will contain attributes that will be of the form:
     vm1_State = "Claimed"
     vm1_Activity = "Busy"
     vm1_EnteredCurrentActivity = 1075249233
     vm2_State = "Unclaimed"
     vm2_Activity = "Idle"
     vm2_EnteredCurrentActivity = 1075240035

The following settings control the number of virtual machines reported for a given SMP host, and what attributes each one has. They are only needed if you do not want to have an SMP machine report to Condor with a separate virtual machine for each CPU, with all shared system resources evenly divided among them. Please read section 3.12.7 on page [*] for details on how to properly configure these settings to suit your needs.

NOTE: You can only change the number of each type of virtual machine the condor_ startd is reporting with a simple reconfig (such as sending a SIGHUP signal, or using the condor_ reconfig command). You cannot change the definition of the different virtual machine types with a reconfig. If you change them, you must restart the condor_ startd for the change to take effect (for example, using condor_restart -startd).

MAX_VIRTUAL_MACHINE_TYPES
The maximum number of different virtual machine types. Note: this is the maximum number of different types, not of actual virtual machines. Defaults to 10. (You should only need to change this setting if you define more than 10 separate virtual machine types, which would be pretty rare.)

VIRTUAL_MACHINE_TYPE_<N>
This setting defines a given virtual machine type, by specifying what part of each shared system resource (like RAM, swap space, etc) this kind of virtual machine gets. N can be any integer from 1 to the value of $(MAX_VIRTUAL_MACHINE_TYPES), such as VIRTUAL_MACHINE_TYPE_1. The format of this entry can be somewhat complex, so please refer to section 3.12.7 on page [*] for details on the different possibilities.

NUM_VIRTUAL_MACHINES_TYPE_<N>
This macro controls how many of a given virtual machine type are actually reported to Condor. There is no default.

NUM_VIRTUAL_MACHINES
If your SMP machine is being evenly divided, and the virtual machine type settings described above are not being used, this macro controls how many virtual machines will be reported. The default is one virtual machine for each CPU. This setting can be used to reserve some CPUs on an SMP which would not be reported to the Condor pool.

The following macros describe the cron capabilities of Condor. The cron mechanism is used to run executables (called modules) directly from the condor_ startd daemon. The output from modules is incorporated into the machine ClassAd generated by the condor_ startd. These capabilities are used in Hawkeye, but can be used in other situations as well.

These configuration macros are divided into three sets. The three sets occurred as the functionality and usage of Condor's cron capabilities evolved. The first set applies to both new and older macros and syntax. The second set applies to the new macros and syntax. The third set applies only to the older (and outdated) macros and syntax.

This first set of configuration macros applies to both new and older macros and syntax.

STARTD_CRON_NAME
Defines a logical name to be used in the formation of related configuration macro names. While not required, this macro makes other macros more readable and maintainable. A common example is
   STARTD_CRON_NAME = HAWKEYE
This example allows the naming of other related macros to contain the string "HAWKEYE" in their name.

STARTD_CRON_CONFIG_VAL
This configuration variable can be used to specify the condor_ config_val program which the modules (jobs) should use to get configuration information from the daemon. If this is provided, a environment variable by the same name with the same value will be passed to all modules.

If STARTD_CRON_NAME is defined, then this configuration macro name is changed from STARTD_CRON_CONFIG_VAL to $(STARTD_CRON_NAME)_CONFIG_VAL. Example:

  HAWKEYE_CONFIG_VAL = /usr/local/condor/bin/condor_config_val

STARTD_CRON_AUTOPUBLISH
Optional setting that determines if the condor_ startd should automatically publish a new update to the condor_ collector after any of the cron modules produce output. Beware that enabling this setting can greatly increase the network traffic in a Condor pool, especially when many modules are executed, or if the period in which they run is short. There are three possible (case insensitive) values for this setting:
Never
This default value causes the condor_ startd to not automatically publish updates based on any cron modules. Instead, updates rely on the usual behavior for sending updates, which is periodic, based on the UPDATE_INTERVAL configuration setting, or whenever a given virtual machine changes state.
Always
Causes the condor_ startd to always send a new update to the condor_ collector whenever any module exits.
If_Changed
Causes the condor_ startd to only send a new update to the condor_ collector if the output produced by a given module is different than the previous output of the same module. The only exception is the LastUpdate attribute (automatically set for all cron modules to be the timestamp when the module last ran), which is ignored when STARTD_CRON_AUTOPUBLISH is set to If_Changed.
Beware that STARTD_CRON_AUTOPUBLISH does not honor the STARTD_CRON_NAME setting described above. Even if STARTD_CRON_NAME is defined, STARTD_CRON_AUTOPUBLISH will have the same name.

The following second set of configuration macros applies only to the new macros and syntax. This set is to be used for all new applications.

STARTD_CRON_JOBLIST
This configuration variable is defined by a whitespace separated list of job names (called modules) to run. Each of these is the logical name of the module. This name must be unique (no two modules may have the same name).

If STARTD_CRON_NAME is defined, then this configuration macro name is changed from STARTD_CRON_JOBLIST to $(STARTD_CRON_NAME)_JOBLIST.

STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_PREFIX
Specifies a string which is prepended by Condor to all attribute names that the module generates. For example, if a prefix is ``xyz_'', and an individual attribute is named ``abc'', the resulting attribute would be ``xyz_abc''. Although it can be quoted, the prefix can contain only alpha-numeric characters.

If STARTD_CRON_NAME is defined, then this configuration macro name is changed from STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_PREFIX to $(STARTD_CRON_NAME)_<ModuleName>_PREFIX.

STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_EXECUTABLE
Used to specify the full path to the executable to run for this module. Note that multiple modules may specify the same executable (although they need to have different names).

If STARTD_CRON_NAME is defined, then this configuration macro name is changed from STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_EXECUTABLE to $(STARTD_CRON_NAME)_<ModuleName>_EXECUTABLE.

STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_PERIOD
The period specifies time intervals at which the module should be run. For periodic modules, this is the time interval that passes between starting the execution of the module. The value may be specified in seconds (append value with the character 's'), in minutes (append value with the character 'm'), or in hours (append value with the character 'h'). As an example, 5m starts the execution of the module every five minutes. If no character is appended to the value, seconds are used as a default. For ``Wait For Exit'' mode, the value has a different meaning; in this case the period specifies the length of time after the module ceases execution before it is restarted. The minimum valid value of the period is 1 second.

If STARTD_CRON_NAME is defined, then this configuration macro name is changed from STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_PERIOD to $(STARTD_CRON_NAME)_<ModuleName>_PERIOD.

STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_MODE
Used to specify the ``Mode'' in which the module operates. Legal values are ``WaitForExit'' and ``Periodic'' (the default).

If STARTD_CRON_NAME is defined, then this configuration macro name is changed from STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_MODE to $(STARTD_CRON_NAME)_<ModuleName>_MODE.

The default ``Periodic'' mode is used for most modules. In this mode, the module is expected to be started by the condor_ startd daemon, gather and publish its data, and then exit.

The ``WaitForExit'' mode is used to specify a module which runs in the ``Wait For Exit'' mode. In this mode, the condor_ startd daemon interprets the ``period'' differently. In this case, it refers to the amount of time to wait after the module exits before restarting it. With a value of 1, the module is kept running nearly continuously.

In general, ``Wait For Exit'' mode is for modules that produce a periodic stream of updated data, but it can be used for other purposes, as well.

STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_RECONFIG
The ``ReConfig'' macro is used to specify whether a module can handle HUP signals, and should be sent a HUP signal when the condor_ startd daemon is reconfigured. The module is expected to reread its configuration at that time. A value of ``True'' enables this setting, and ``False'' disables it.

If STARTD_CRON_NAME is defined, then this configuration macro name is changed from STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_RECONFIG to $(STARTD_CRON_NAME)_<ModuleName>_RECONFIG.

STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_KILL
The ``Kill'' macro is applicable on for modules running in the ``Periodic'' mode. Possible values are ``True'' and ``False'' (the default).

If STARTD_CRON_NAME is defined, then this configuration macro name is changed from STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_KILL to $(STARTD_CRON_NAME)_<ModuleName>_KILL.

This macro controls the behavior of the condor_ startd when it detects that the module's executable is still running when it is time to start the module for a run. If enabled, the condor_ startd will kill and restart the process in this condition. If not enabled, the existing process is allowed to continue running.

STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_ARGS
The command line arguments to pass to the module to be executed.

If STARTD_CRON_NAME is defined, then this configuration macro name is changed from STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_ARGS to $(STARTD_CRON_NAME)_<ModuleName>_ARGS.

STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_ENV
The environment string to pass to the module. The syntax is the same as that of DAEMONNAME_ENVIRONMENT in 3.3.9.

If STARTD_CRON_NAME is defined, then this configuration macro name is changed from STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_ENV to $(STARTD_CRON_NAME)_<ModuleName>_ENV.

STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_CWD
The working directory in which to start the module.

If STARTD_CRON_NAME is defined, then this configuration macro name is changed from STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_CWD to $(STARTD_CRON_NAME)_<ModuleName>_CWD.

STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_OPTIONS
A colon separated list of options. Not all combinations of options make sense; when a nonsense combination is listed, the last one in the list is followed.

If STARTD_CRON_NAME is defined, then this configuration macro name is changed from STARTD_CRON_<ModuleName>_OPTIONS to $(STARTD_CRON_NAME)_<ModuleName>_OPTIONS.

Here is a complete configuration example that uses Hawkeye.
# Hawkeye Job Definitions
STARTD_CRON_NAME = HAWKEYE

# Job 1
HAWKEYE_JOBLIST = job1
HAWKEYE_job1_PREFIX = prefix_
HAWKEYE_job1_EXECUTABLE = $(MODULES)/job1
HAWKEYE_job1_PERIOD = 5m
HAWKEYE_job1_MODE = WaitForExit
HAWKEYE_job1_KILL = false
HAWKEYE_job1_ARGS =-foo -bar
HAWKEYE_job1_ENV = xyzzy=somevalue

# Job 2
HAWKEYE_JOBLIST = $(HAWKEYE_JOBLIST) job2
HAWKEYE_job2_PREFIX = prefix_
HAWKEYE_job2_EXECUTABLE = $(MODULES)/job2
HAWKEYE_job2_PERIOD = 1h
HAWKEYE_job2_ENV = lwpi=somevalue

The following third set of configuration macros applies only to older macros and syntax. This set is documented for completeness and backwards compatibility. Do not use these configuration macros for any new application. Future releases of Condor may disable the use of this set.

STARTD_CRON_JOBS
The list of the modules to execute. In Hawkeye, this is usually named HAWKEYE_JOBS. This configuration variable is defined by a whitespace or newline separated list of jobs (called modules) to run, where each module is specified using the format
   modulename:prefix:executable:period[:options]
Each of these fields can be surrounded by matching quote characters (single quote or double quote, but they must match). This allows colon and whitespace characters to be specified. For example, the following specifies an executable name with a colon and a space in it:
   foo:foo_:"c:/some dir/foo.exe":10m
These individual fields are described below: NOTE: The configuration file parsing logic will strip whitespace from the beginning and end of continuation lines. Thus, a job list like below will be misinterpreted and will not work as expected:
# Hawkeye Job Definitions
HAWKEYE_JOBS   =\
    JOB1:prefix_:$(MODULES)/job1:5m:nokill\
    JOB2:prefix_:$(MODULES)/job1_co:1h
HAWKEYE_JOB1_ARGS =-foo -bar
HAWKEYE_JOB1_ENV = xyzzy=somevalue
HAWKEYE_JOB2_ENV = lwpi=somevalue
Instead, write this as below:
# Hawkeye Job Definitions
HAWKEYE_JOBS   =

# Job 1
HAWKEYE_JOBS = $(HAWKEYE_JOBS) JOB1:prefix_:$(MODULES)/job1:5m:nokill
HAWKEYE_JOB1_ARGS =-foo -bar
HAWKEYE_JOB1_ENV = xyzzy=somevalue

# Job 2
HAWKEYE_JOBS = $(HAWKEYE_JOBS) JOB2:prefix_:$(MODULES)/job2:1h
HAWKEYE_JOB2_ENV = lwpi=somevalue

The following macros control the optional computation of resource availability statistics in the condor_ startd.

STARTD_COMPUTE_AVAIL_STATS
A boolean that determines if the condor_ startd computes resource availability statistics. The default is False.

If STARTD_COMPUTE_AVAIL_STATS = True, the condor_ startd will define the following ClassAd attributes for resources:

AvailTime
The proportion of the time (between 0.0 and 1.0) that this resource has been in a state other than Owner.
LastAvailInterval
The duration (in seconds) of the last period between Owner states.

The following attributes will also be included if the resource is not in the Owner state:

AvailSince
The time at which the resource last left the Owner state. Measured in the number of seconds since the epoch (00:00:00 UTC, Jan 1, 1970).
AvailTimeEstimate
Based on past history, an estimate of how long the current period between Owner states will last.

STARTD_AVAIL_CONFIDENCE
A floating point number representing the confidence level of the condor_ startd daemon's AvailTime estimate. By default, the estimate is based on the 80th percentile of past values (that is, the value is initially set to 0.8).

STARTD_MAX_AVAIL_PERIOD_SAMPLES
An integer that limits the number of samples of past available intervals stored by the condor_ startd to limit memory and disk consumption. Each sample requires 4 bytes of memory and approximately 10 bytes of disk space.

The following configuration variables support java universe jobs.

JAVA
The full path to the Java interpreter (the Java Virtual Machine).

JAVA_MAXHEAP_ARGUMENT
An incomplete command line argument to the Java interpreter (the Java Virtual Machine) to specify the switch name for the Maxheap Argument. Condor uses it to construct the maximum heap size for the Java Virtual Machine. For example, the value for the Sun JVM is -Xmx.

JAVA_CLASSPATH_ARGUMENT
The command line argument to the Java interpreter (the Java Virtual Machine) that specifies the Java Classpath. Classpath is a Java-specific term that denotes the list of locations (.jar files and/or directories) where the Java interpreter can look for the Java class files that a Java program requires.

JAVA_CLASSPATH_SEPARATOR
The single character used to delimit constructed entries in the Classpath for the given operating system and Java Virtual Machine. If not defined, the operating system is queried for its default Classpath separator.

JAVA_CLASSPATH_DEFAULT
A list of path names to .jar files to be added to the Java Classpath by default. The comma and/or space character delimits list entries.

JAVA_EXTRA_ARGUMENTS
A list of additional arguments to be passed to the Java executable.


3.3.11 condor_ schedd Configuration File Entries

These macros control the condor_ schedd.

SHADOW
This macro determines the full path of the condor_ shadow binary that the condor_ schedd spawns. It is normally defined in terms of $(SBIN).

SHADOW_PVM
This macro determines the full path of the special condor_ shadow.pvm binary used for supporting PVM jobs that the condor_ schedd spawns. It is normally defined in terms of $(SBIN).

START_LOCAL_UNIVERSE
A boolean value that defaults to True. The condor_ schedd uses this macro to determine whether to start a local universe job. At intervals determined by SCHEDD_INTERVAL, the condor_ schedd daemon evaluates this macro for each idle local universe job that it has. For each job, if the START_LOCAL_UNIVERSE macro is True, then the job's Requirements expression is evaluated. If both conditions are met, then the job is allowed to begin execution.

The following example only allows 10 local universe jobs to execute concurrently. The attribute TotalLocalJobsRunning is supplied by condor_ schedd's ClassAd:

    START_LOCAL_UNIVERSE = TotalLocalJobsRunning < 10

START_SCHEDULER_UNIVERSE
A boolean value that defaults to True. The condor_ schedd uses this macro to determine whether to start a scheduler universe job. At intervals determined by SCHEDD_INTERVAL, the condor_ schedd daemon evaluates this macro for each idle scheduler universe job that it has. For each job, if the START_SCHEDULER_UNIVERSE macro is True, then the job's Requirements expression is evaluated. If both conditions are met, then the job is allowed to begin execution.

The following example only allows 10 scheduler universe jobs to execute concurrently. The attribute TotalSchedulerJobsRunning is supplied by condor_ schedd's ClassAd:

    START_SCHEDULER_UNIVERSE = TotalSchedulerJobsRunning < 10

MAX_JOBS_RUNNING
This macro limits the number of processes spawned by a given condor_ schedd, for all job universes except the grid universe. See section 2.4.1. This includes, but is not limited to condor_ shadow processes, and scheduler universe processes, including condor_ dagman. The actual number of condor_ shadows may be less if you have reached your $(RESERVED_SWAP) limit. This macro has a default value of 200.

MAX_JOBS_SUBMITTED
This integer value limits the number of jobs permitted in a condor_ schedd daemon's queue. Submission of a new cluster of jobs fails, if the total number of jobs would exceed this limit. The default value for this variable is the largest positive integer value.

MAX_SHADOW_EXCEPTIONS
This macro controls the maximum number of times that condor_ shadow processes can have a fatal error (exception) before the condor_ schedd will relinquish the match associated with the dying shadow. Defaults to 5.

SCHEDD_INTERVAL
This macro determines both how often the condor_ schedd sends a ClassAd update to the condor_ collector and how often the condor_ schedd daemon evaluates jobs. It is defined in terms of seconds and defaults to 300 (every 5 minutes).

JOB_START_COUNT
This macro works together with the JOB_START_DELAY macro to throttle job starts. The default and minimum values for this integer configuration variable are both 1. Small values for this macro are preferred and will minimize the load upon the condor_ schedd daemon.

JOB_START_DELAY
This integer-valued macro works together with the JOB_START_COUNT macro to throttle job starts. The condor_ schedd daemon starts $(JOB_START_COUNT) jobs at a time, then delays for $(JOB_START_DELAY) seconds before starting the next set of jobs. This delay prevents a sudden, large load on the submit machine as it spawns many condor_ shadow daemons simultaneously, and it prevents having to deal with their start up activity all at once. The resulting job start rate averages as fast as ($(JOB_START_COUNT)/$(JOB_START_DELAY)) jobs/second. This configuration variable is also used during the graceful shutdown of the condor_ schedd daemon. During graceful shutdown, this macro determines the wait time in between requesting each condor_ shadow daemon to gracefully shut down. It is defined in terms of seconds and defaults to 2. Setting this macro to a lower value is not advised, as it can overwhelm the condor_ schedd daemon.

JOB_IS_FINISHED_INTERVAL
The condor_ schedd maintains a list of jobs that are ready to permanently leave the job queue, e.g. they have completed or been removed. This integer-valued macro specifies a delay in seconds to place between the taking jobs permanently out of the queue. The default value is 0, which tells the condor_ schedd to not impose any delay.

ALIVE_INTERVAL
This macro determines how often the condor_ schedd should send a keep alive message to any condor_ startd it has claimed. When the condor_ schedd claims a condor_ startd, it tells the condor_ startd how often it is going to send these messages. If the condor_ startd does not receive any of these keep alive messages during a certain period of time (defined via MAX_CLAIM_ALIVES_MISSED , described on page [*]) the condor_ startd releases the claim, and the condor_ schedd no longer pays for the resource (in terms of user priority in the system). The macro is defined in terms of seconds and defaults to 300 (every 5 minutes).

REQUEST_CLAIM_TIMEOUT
This macro sets the time (in seconds) that the condor_ schedd will wait for a claim to be granted by the condor_ startd. The default is 30 minutes. This is only likely to matter if the condor_ startd has an existing claim and it takes a long time for the existing claim to be preempted due to MaxJobRetirementTime. Once a request times out, the condor_ schedd will simply begin the process of finding a machine for the job all over again.

SHADOW_SIZE_ESTIMATE
This macro sets the estimated virtual memory size of each condor_ shadow process. Specified in kilobytes. The default varies from platform to platform.

SHADOW_RENICE_INCREMENT
When the condor_ schedd spawns a new condor_ shadow, it can do so with a nice-level. A nice-level is a Unix mechanism that allows users to assign their own processes a lower priority so that the processes do not interfere with interactive use of the machine. This is very handy for keeping a submit machine with lots of shadows running still useful to the owner of the machine. The value can be any integer between 0 and 19, with a value of 19 being the lowest priority. It defaults to 10.

SCHED_UNIV_RENICE_INCREMENT
Analogous to JOB_RENICE_INCREMENT and SHADOW_RENICE_INCREMENT, scheduler universe jobs can be given a nice-level. See JOB_RENICE_INCREMENT in section 3.3.14 for further explanation; default value and range of legal values are the same.

QUEUE_CLEAN_INTERVAL
The condor_ schedd maintains the job queue on a given machine. It does so in a persistent way such that if the condor_ schedd crashes, it can recover a valid state of the job queue. The mechanism it uses is a transaction-based log file (the job_queue.log file, not the SchedLog file). This file contains an initial state of the job queue, and a series of transactions that were performed on the queue (such as new jobs submitted, jobs completing, and checkpointing). Periodically, the condor_ schedd will go through this log, truncate all the transactions and create a new file with containing only the new initial state of the log. This is a somewhat expensive operation, but it speeds up when the condor_ schedd restarts since there are fewer transactions it has to play to figure out what state the job queue is really in. This macro determines how often the condor_ schedd should rework this queue to cleaning it up. It is defined in terms of seconds and defaults to 86400 (once a day).

WALL_CLOCK_CKPT_INTERVAL
The job queue contains a counter for each job's ``wall clock'' run time, i.e., how long each job has executed so far. This counter is displayed by condor_ q. The counter is updated when the job is evicted or when the job completes. When the condor_ schedd crashes, the run time for jobs that are currently running will not be added to the counter (and so, the run time counter may become smaller than the CPU time counter). The condor_ schedd saves run time ``checkpoints'' periodically for running jobs so if the condor_ schedd crashes, only run time since the last checkpoint is lost. This macro controls how often the condor_ schedd saves run time checkpoints. It is defined in terms of seconds and defaults to 3600 (one hour). A value of 0 will disable wall clock checkpoints.

ALLOW_REMOTE_SUBMIT
Starting with Condor Version 6.0, users can run condor_ submit on one machine and actually submit jobs to another machine in the pool. This is called a remote submit. Jobs submitted in this way are entered into the job queue owned by the Unix user nobody. This macro determines whether this is allowed. It defaults to False.

QUEUE_ALL_USERS_TRUSTED
. Defaults to False. If set to True, then unauthenticated users are allowed to write to the queue, and also we always trust whatever the Owner value is set to be by the client in the job ad. This was added so users can continue to use the SOAP web-services interface over HTTP (w/o authenticating) to submit jobs in a secure, controlled environment - for instance, in a portal setting.

QUEUE_SUPER_USERS
This macro determines what user names on a given machine have super-user access to the job queue, meaning that they can modify or delete the job ClassAds of other users. (Normally, you can only modify or delete ClassAds from the job queue that you own). Whatever user name corresponds with the UID that Condor is running as (usually the Unix user condor) will automatically be included in this list because that is needed for Condor's proper functioning. See section 3.6.12 on UIDs in Condor for more details on this. By default, we give root the ability to remove other user's jobs, in addition to user condor.

SCHEDD_LOCK
This macro specifies what lock file should be used for access to the SchedLog file. It must be a separate file from the SchedLog, since the SchedLog may be rotated and synchronization across log file rotations is desired. This macro is defined relative to the $(LOCK) macro. If you decide to change this setting (not recommended), be sure to change the $(VALID_LOG_FILES) entry that condor_ preen uses as well.

SCHEDD_NAME
A unique name given for a condor_ schedd daemon on a machine. Defaults to the fully qualified hostname of the machine where the condor_ schedd is running. However, this configuration macro is used to uniquely identify condor_ schedd ClassAds if more than one condor_ schedd is running on the same host, for example, with many Personal Condor installations running as different users on the same machine. In that case, the recommended form for SCHEDD_NAME is username@full.host.name, where username is the user that a given condor_ schedd is running as.

See the description of MASTER_NAME in section 3.3.9 on page [*] for a description of valid Condor daemon names. Also, note that if the MASTER_NAME setting is defined for the condor_ master that spawned a given condor_ schedd, that name will take precedence over whatever is defined in SCHEDD_NAME.

SCHEDD_ATTRS
This macro is described in section 3.3.5 as <SUBSYS>_ATTRS.

SCHEDD_DEBUG
This macro (and other settings related to debug logging in the condor_ schedd) is described in section 3.3.4 as <SUBSYS>_DEBUG.

SCHEDD_ADDRESS_FILE
This macro is described in section 3.3.5 as <SUBSYS>_ADDRESS_FILE.

SCHEDD_EXECUTE
A directory to use as a temporary sandbox for local universe jobs. Defaults to $(SPOOL)/execute.

FLOCK_NEGOTIATOR_HOSTS
This macro defines a list of negotiator host names (not including the local $(NEGOTIATOR_HOST) machine) for pools in which the condor_ schedd should attempt to run jobs. Hosts in the list should be in order of preference. The condor_ schedd will only send a request to a central manager in the list if the local pool and pools earlier in the list are not satisfying all the job requests. $(HOSTALLOW_NEGOTIATOR_SCHEDD) (see section 3.3.5) must also be configured to allow negotiators from all of the $(FLOCK_NEGOTIATOR_HOSTS) to contact the condor_ schedd. Please make sure the $(NEGOTIATOR_HOST) is first in the $(HOSTALLOW_NEGOTIATOR_SCHEDD) list. Similarly, the central managers of the remote pools must be configured to listen to requests from this condor_ schedd.

FLOCK_COLLECTOR_HOSTS
This macro defines a list of collector host names for pools in which the condor_ schedd should attempt to run jobs. The collectors must be specified in order, corresponding to the $(FLOCK_NEGOTIATOR_HOSTS) list. In the typical case, where each pool has the collector and negotiator running on the same machine, $(FLOCK_COLLECTOR_HOSTS) should have the same definition as $(FLOCK_NEGOTIATOR_HOSTS).

NEGOTIATE_ALL_JOBS_IN_CLUSTER
If this macro is set to False (the default), when the condor_ schedd fails to start an idle job, it will not try to start any other idle jobs in the same cluster during that negotiation cycle. This makes negotiation much more efficient for large job clusters. However, in some cases other jobs in the cluster can be started even though an earlier job can't. For example, the jobs' requirements may differ, because of different disk space, memory, or operating system requirements. Or, machines may be willing to run only some jobs in the cluster, because their requirements reference the jobs' virtual memory size or other attribute. Setting this macro to True will force the condor_ schedd to try to start all idle jobs in each negotiation cycle. This will make negotiation cycles last longer, but it will ensure that all jobs that can be started will be started.

PERIODIC_EXPR_INTERVAL
This macro determines the period, in seconds, between evaluation of periodic job control expressions, such as periodic_hold, periodic_release, and periodic_remove, given by the user in a Condor submit file. By default, this value is 300 seconds (5 minutes). A value of 0 prevents the condor_ schedd from performing the periodic evaluations.

SCHEDD_ASSUME_NEGOTIATOR_GONE
This macro determines the period, in seconds, that the condor_ schedd will wait for the condor_ negotiator to initiate a negotiation cycle before the schedd will simply try to claim any local condor_ startd. This allows for a machine that is acting as both a submit and execute node to run jobs locally if it cannot communicate with the central manager. The default value, if not specified, is 4 x $(NEGOTIATOR_INTERVAL). If $(NEGOTIATOR_INTERVAL) is not defined, then SCHEDD_ASSUME_NEGOTIATOR_GONE will default to 1200 (20 minutes).

SCHEDD_ROUND_ATTR_<xxxx>
An integer-valued macro that instructs the condor_ schedd to round up scalar job ClassAd attributes to a specific number of decimal places. This is desirable to improve job scheduling performance, since it allows Condor's auto-clustering algorithm to bucket attributes such as ImageSize. Replace <xxxx> with the name of the attribute to round, and set this macro equal to the number of decimal places to round up. For example, to round the value of job ClassAd attribute foo up to the nearest 100, set
        SCHEDD_ROUND_ATTR_foo = 2
When the schedd rounds up an attribute value, it will save the raw (un-rounded) actual value in an attribute with the same name appended with ``_RAW". So in the above example, the raw value will be stored in attribute foo_RAW in the job ClassAd. The following are set by default:
        SCHEDD_ROUND_ATTR_ImageSize = 4
        SCHEDD_ROUND_ATTR_ExecutableSize = 4
        SCHEDD_ROUND_ATTR_DiskUsage = 4
		SCHEDD_ROUND_ATTR_NumCkpts = 4
Thus, the above attributes are all rounded up from Kbytes to the nearest 10 Megabytes.

SCHEDD_BACKUP_SPOOL
This macro is used to enable the condor_ schedd to make a backup of the job queue as it starts. If set to ``True'', the condor_ schedd will create host specific a backup of the current spool file to the spool directory. This backup file will be overwritten each time the condor_ schedd starts. SCHEDD_BACKUP_SPOOL defaults to ``False''.

MPI_CONDOR_RSH_PATH
The complete path to the special version of rsh that is required to spawn MPI jobs under Condor. $(LIBEXEC) is the proper value for this configuration variable, required when running MPI dedicated jobs.

SCHEDD_PREEMPTION_REQUIREMENTS
This boolean expression is utilized only for machines allocated by a dedicated scheduler. When True, a machine becomes a candidate for job preemption. This configuration variable has no default; when not defined, preemption will never be considered.

SCHEDD_PREEMPTION_RANK
This floating point value is utilized only for machines allocated by a dedicated scheduler. It is evaluated in context of a job ClassAd, and it represents a machine's preference for running a job. This configuration variable has no default; when not defined, preemption will never be considered.

ParallelSchedulingGroup
For parallel jobs which must be assigned within a group of machines (and not cross group boundaries), this configuration variable identifies members of a group. Each machine within a group sets this configuration variable with a string that identifies the group.


3.3.12 condor_ shadow Configuration File Entries

These settings affect the condor_ shadow.

SHADOW_LOCK
This macro specifies the lock file to be used for access to the ShadowLog file. It must be a separate file from the ShadowLog, since the ShadowLog may be rotated and you want to synchronize access across log file rotations. This macro is defined relative to the $(LOCK) macro. If you decide to change this setting (not recommended), be sure to change the $(VALID_LOG_FILES) entry that condor_ preen uses as well.

SHADOW_DEBUG
This macro (and other settings related to debug logging in the shadow) is described in section 3.3.4 as <SUBSYS>_DEBUG.

SHADOW_QUEUE_UPDATE_INTERVAL
The amount of time (in seconds) between ClassAd updates that the condor_ shadow daemon sends to the condor_ schedd daemon. Defaults to 900 (15 minutes).

COMPRESS_PERIODIC_CKPT
This boolean macro specifies whether the shadow should instruct applications to compress periodic checkpoints (when possible). The default is False.

COMPRESS_VACATE_CKPT
This boolean macro specifies whether the shadow should instruct applications to compress vacate checkpoints (when possible). The default is False.

PERIODIC_MEMORY_SYNC
This boolean macro specifies whether the shadow should instruct applications to commit dirty memory pages to swap space during a periodic checkpoint. The default is False. This potentially reduces the number of dirty memory pages at vacate time, thereby reducing swapping activity on the remote machine.

SLOW_CKPT_SPEED
This macro specifies the speed at which vacate checkpoints should be written, in kilobytes per second. If zero (the default), vacate checkpoints are written as fast as possible. Writing vacate checkpoints slowly can avoid overwhelming the remote machine with swapping activity.


3.3.13 condor_ shadow.pvm Configuration File Entries

These macros control the condor_ shadow.pvm, the special shadow that supports PVM jobs inside Condor. See section [*] on Installing PVM Support in Condor for details. condor_ shadow macros also apply to this special shadow. See section 3.3.12.

PVMD
This macro holds the full path to the special condor_ pvmd, the Condor PVM daemon. This daemon is installed in the regular Condor release directory by default, so the macro is usually defined in terms of $(SBIN).

PVMGS
This macro holds the full path to the special condor_ pvmgs, the Condor PVM Group Server daemon, which is needed to support PVM groups. This daemon is installed in the regular Condor release directory by default, so the macro is usually defined in terms of $(SBIN).


3.3.14 condor_ starter Configuration File Entries

These settings affect the condor_ starter.

EXEC_TRANSFER_ATTEMPTS
Sometimes due to a router misconfiguration, kernel bug, or other Act of God network problem, the transfer of the initial checkpoint from the submit machine to the execute machine will fail midway through. This parameter allows a retry of the transfer a certain number of times that must be equal to or greater than 1. If this parameter is not specified, or specified incorrectly, then it will default to three. If the transfer of the initial executable fails every attempt, then the job goes back into the idle state until the next renegotiation cycle.

NOTE: : This parameter does not exist in the NT starter.

JOB_RENICE_INCREMENT
When the condor_ starter spawns a Condor job, it can do so with a nice-level. A nice-level is a Unix mechanism that allows users to assign their own processes a lower priority, such that these processes do not interfere with interactive use of the machine. For machines with lots of real memory and swap space, such that the only scarce resource is CPU time, use this macro in conjunction with a policy that allows Condor to always start jobs on the machines. Condor jobs would always run, but interactive response on the machines would never suffer. A user most likely will not notice Condor is running jobs. See section 3.5 on Startd Policy Configuration for more details on setting up a policy for starting and stopping jobs on a given machine.

The integer value is set by the condor_ starter daemon for each job just before the job runs. The range of allowable values are integers in the range of 0 to 19 (inclusive), with a value of 19 being the lowest priority. If the integer value is outside this range, then on a Unix machine, a value greater than 19 is auto-decreased to 19; a value less than 0 is treated as 0. For values outside this range, a Windows machine ignores the value and uses the default instead. The default value is 10, which maps to the idle priority class on a Windows machine.

STARTER_LOCAL_LOGGING
This macro determines whether the starter should do local logging to its own log file, or send debug information back to the condor_ shadow where it will end up in the ShadowLog. It defaults to True.

STARTER_DEBUG
This setting (and other settings related to debug logging in the starter) is described above in section 3.3.4 as $(<SUBSYS>_DEBUG).

STARTER_UPDATE_INTERVAL
The amount of time (in seconds) between ClassAd updates that the condor_ starter daemon sends to the condor_ shadow daemon. Defaults to 1200 (20 minutes).

USER_JOB_WRAPPER
The full path to an executable or script. This macro allows an administrator to specify a wrapper script to handle the execution of all user jobs. If specified, Condor never directly executes a job, but instead invokes the program specified by this macro. The command-line arguments passed to this program will include the full-path to the actual user job which should be executed, followed by all the command-line parameters to pass to the user job. This wrapper program must ultimately replace its image with the user job; in other words, it must exec() the user job, not fork() it. For instance, if the wrapper program is a C/Korn shell script, the last line of execution should be:
        exec $*
This can potentially lose information about the arguments. Any argument with embedded whitespace will be split into multiple arguments. For example the argument "argument one" will become the two arguments "argument" and "one". For Bourne type shells (sh, bash, ksh), the following preserves the arguments:
        exec "$@"
For the C type shells (csh, tcsh), the following preserves the arguments:
        exec $*:q

For Windows machines, the wrapper will either be a batch script (with a file extension of .bat or .cmd) or an executable (with a file extension of .exe or .com).

USE_VISIBLE_DESKTOP
This setting is only meaningful on Windows machines. If True, Condor will allow the job to create windows on the desktop of the execute machine and interact with the job. This is particularly useful for debugging why an application will not run under Condor. If False, Condor uses the default behavior of creating a new, non-visible desktop to run the job on. See section 6.2 for details on how Condor interacts with the desktop.

STARTER_JOB_ENVIRONMENT
This macro sets the default environment inherited by jobs. The syntax is the same as the syntax for environment settings in the job submit file (see page [*]). If the same environment variable is assigned by this macro and by the user in the submit file, the user's setting takes precedence.

JOB_INHERITS_STARTER_ENVIRONMENT
A boolean value that defaults to False. When True, it causes jobs to inherit all environment variables from the condor_ starter. This is useful for glidein jobs that need to access environment variables from the batch system running the glidein daemons. When both the user job and STARTER_JOB_ENVIRONMENT define an environment variable that is in the condor_ starter's environment, the user job's definition takes precedence. This variable does not apply to standard or pvm universe jobs.


3.3.15 condor_ submit Configuration File Entries

DEFAULT_UNIVERSE
The universe under which a job is executed may be specified in the submit description file. If it is not specified in the submit description file, then this variable specifies the universe (when defined). If the universe is not specified in the submit description file, and if this variable is not defined, then the default universe for a job will be the standard universe.

If you want condor_ submit to automatically append an expression to the Requirements expression or Rank expression of jobs at your site use the following macros:

APPEND_REQ_VANILLA
Expression to be appended to vanilla job requirements.

APPEND_REQ_STANDARD
Expression to be appended to standard job requirements.

APPEND_REQUIREMENTS
Expression to be appended to any type of universe jobs. However, if APPEND_REQ_VANILLA or APPEND_REQ_STANDARD is defined, then ignore the APPEND_REQUIREMENTS for those universes.

APPEND_RANK
Expression to be appended to job rank. APPEND_RANK_STANDARD or APPEND_RANK_VANILLA will override this setting if defined.

APPEND_RANK_STANDARD
Expression to be appended to standard job rank.

APPEND_RANK_VANILLA
Expression to append to vanilla job rank.

NOTE: The APPEND_RANK_STANDARD and APPEND_RANK_VANILLA macros were called APPEND_PREF_STANDARD and APPEND_PREF_VANILLA in previous versions of Condor.

In addition, you may provide default Rank expressions if your users do not specify their own with:

DEFAULT_RANK_VANILLA
Default Rank for vanilla jobs.

DEFAULT_RANK_STANDARD
Default Rank for standard jobs.

Both of these macros default to the jobs preferring machines where there is more main memory than the image size of the job, expressed as:

        ((Memory*1024) > Imagesize)

DEFAULT_IO_BUFFER_SIZE
Condor keeps a buffer of recently-used data for each file an application opens. This macro specifies the default maximum number of bytes to be buffered for each open file at the executing machine. The condor_ status buffer_size command will override this default. If this macro is undefined, a default size of 512 KB will be used.

DEFAULT_IO_BUFFER_BLOCK_SIZE
When buffering is enabled, Condor will attempt to consolidate small read and write operations into large blocks. This macro specifies the default block size Condor will use. The condor_ status buffer_block_size command will override this default. If this macro is undefined, a default size of 32 KB will be used.

SUBMIT_SKIP_FILECHECK
If True, condor_ submit behaves as if the -d command-line option is used. This tells condor_ submit to disable file permission checks when submitting a job. This can significantly decrease the amount of time required to submit a large group of jobs. The default value is False.

SUBMIT_SEND_RESCHEDULE
A boolean expression that when False, prevents condor_ submit from automatically sending a condor_ reschedule command as it completes. The condor_ reschedule command causes the condor_ schedd daemon to start searching for machines with which to match the submitted jobs. When True, this step always occurs. In the case that the machine where the job(s) are submitted is managing a huge number of jobs (thousands or tens of thousands), this step would hurt performance in such a way that it became an obstacle to scalability. The default value is True.

SUBMIT_EXPRS
The given comma-separated, named expressions are inserted into all the job ClassAds that condor_ submit creates. This is equivalent to the ``+'' syntax in submit files. See the the condor_ submit manual page on page [*] for details on using the ``+'' syntax to add attributes to the job ClassAd. Attributes defined in the submit description file with ``+'' will override attributes defined in the config file with SUBMIT_EXPRS.

LOG_ON_NFS_IS_ERROR
A boolean value that controls whether condor_ submit prohibits job submit files with user log files on NFS. If LOG_ON_NFS_IS_ERROR is set to True, such submit files will be rejected. If LOG_ON_NFS_IS_ERROR is set to False, submitting such a file results in a warning, but the job will be submitted. If not defined, LOG_ON_NFS_IS_ERROR defaults to False.

SUBMIT_MAX_PROCS_IN_CLUSTER
An integer value that limits the maximum number of jobs that would be assigned within a single cluster. Job submissions that would exceed the defined value fail, issuing an error message, and with no jobs submitted. The default value is 0, which does not limit the number of jobs assigned a single cluster number.


3.3.16 condor_ preen Configuration File Entries

These macros affect condor_ preen.

PREEN_ADMIN
This macro sets the e-mail address where condor_ preen will send e-mail (if it is configured to send email at all... see the entry for PREEN). Defaults to $(CONDOR_ADMIN).

VALID_SPOOL_FILES
This macro contains a (comma or space separated) list of files that condor_ preen considers valid files to find in the $(SPOOL) directory. Defaults to all the files that are valid. A change to the $(HISTORY) macro requires a change to this macro as well.

VALID_LOG_FILES
This macro contains a (comma or space separated) list of files that condor_ preen considers valid files to find in the $(LOG) directory. Defaults to all the files that are valid. A change to the names of any of the log files above requires a change to this macro as well. In addition, the defaults for the $(<SUBSYS>_ADDRESS_FILE) are listed here, so a change to those requires a change this entry as well.


3.3.17 condor_ collector Configuration File Entries

These macros affect the condor_ collector.

CLASSAD_LIFETIME
This macro determines the default maximum age for ClassAds collected by the condor_ collector. ClassAd older than the maximum age are discarded by the condor_ collector as stale.

If present, the ClassAd attribute ``ClassAdLifetime'' specifies the ad's lifetime in seconds. If ``ClassAdLifetime'' is not present in the ad, the condor_ collector will use the value of $(CLASSAD_LIFETIME). The macro is defined in terms of seconds, and defaults to 900 (15 minutes).

MASTER_CHECK_INTERVAL
This macro defines how often the collector should check for machines that have ClassAds from some daemons, but not from the condor_ master (orphaned daemons) and send e-mail about it. It is defined in seconds and defaults to 10800 (3 hours).

COLLECTOR_REQUIREMENTS
A boolean expression that filters out unwanted ClassAd updates. The expression is evaluated for ClassAd updates that have passed through enabled security authorization checks. The default behavior when this expression is not defined is to allow all ClassAd updates to take place. If False, a ClassAd update will be rejected.

Stronger security mechanisms are the better way to authorize or deny updates to the condor_ collector. This configuration variable exists to help those that use host-based security, and do not trust all processes that run on the hosts in the pool. This configuration variable may be used to throw out ClassAds that should not be allowed. For example, for condor_ startd daemons that run on a fixed port, configure this expression to ensure that only machine ClassAds advertising the expected fixed port are accepted. As a convenience, before evaluating the expression, some basic sanity checks are performed on the ClassAd to ensure that all of the ClassAd attributes used by Condor to contain IP:port information are consistent. To validate this information, the attribute to check is TARGET.MyAddress.

CLIENT_TIMEOUT
Network timeout that the condor_ collector uses when talking to any daemons or tools that are sending it a ClassAd update. It is defined in seconds and defaults to 30.

QUERY_TIMEOUT
Network timeout when talking to anyone doing a query. It is defined in seconds and defaults to 60.

CONDOR_DEVELOPERS
By default, Condor will send e-mail once per week to this address with the output of the condor_ status command, which lists how many machines are in the pool and how many are running jobs. The default value of condor-admin@cs.wisc.edu will send this report to the Condor Team developers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The Condor Team uses these weekly status messages in order to have some idea as to how many Condor pools exist in the world. We appreciate getting the reports, as this is one way we can convince funding agencies that Condor is being used in the real world. If you do not wish this information to be sent to the Condor Team, explicitly set the value to NONE to disable this feature, or replace the address with a desired location. If undefined (commented out) in the configuration file, Condor follows its default behavior.

COLLECTOR_NAME
This macro is used to specify a short description of your pool. It should be about 20 characters long. For example, the name of the UW-Madison Computer Science Condor Pool is ``UW-Madison CS''. While this macro might seem similar to MASTER_NAME or SCHEDD_NAME, it is totally unrelated. Those settings are used to unique identify (and locate) a specific set of Condor daemons if there are more than one running on the same machine. The COLLECTOR_NAME setting is just used as a human-readable string to describe the pool, which is included in the updates set to the CONDOR_DEVELOPERS_COLLECTOR (see below).

CONDOR_DEVELOPERS_COLLECTOR
By default, every pool sends periodic updates to a central condor_ collector at UW-Madison with basic information about the status of your pool. This includes only the number of total machines, the number of jobs submitted, the number of machines running jobs, the host name of your central manager, and the $(COLLECTOR_NAME) specified above. These updates help the Condor Team see how Condor is being used around the world. By default, they will be sent to condor.cs.wisc.edu. If you do not want these updates to be sent from your pool, explicitly set this macro to NONE. If undefined (commented out) in the configuration file, Condor follows its default behavior.

COLLECTOR_SOCKET_BUFSIZE
This specifies the buffer size, in bytes, reserved for condor_ collector network UDP sockets. The default is 10240000, or a ten megabyte buffer. This is a healthy size, even for a large pool. The larger this value, the less likely the condor_ collector will have stale information about the pool due to dropping update packets. If your pool is small or your central manager has very little RAM, considering setting this parameter to a lower value (perhaps 256000 or 128000).

NOTE: For some Linux distributions, it may be necessary to configure a larger value than the default; this parameter is /proc/sys/net/core/rmem_max . You can see the values that the condor_ collector actually used by enabling D_FULLDEBUG for the collector and looking at the log line that looks like this:

Reset OS socket buffer size to 2048k (UDP), 255k (TCP).

COLLECTOR_TCP_SOCKET_BUFSIZE

This specifies the TCP buffer size, in bytes, reserved for condor_ collector network sockets. The default is 131072, or a 128 kilobyte buffer. This is a healthy size, even for a large pool. The larger this value, the less likely the condor_ collector will have stale information about the pool due to dropping update packets. If your pool is small or your central manager has very little RAM, considering setting this parameter to a lower value (perhaps 65536 or 32768).

NOTE: See the note for COLLECTOR_SOCKET_BUFSIZE .

COLLECTOR_SOCKET_CACHE_SIZE
If your site wants to use TCP connections to send ClassAd updates to the collector, you must use this setting to enable a cache of TCP sockets (in addition to enabling UPDATE_COLLECTOR_WITH_TCP ). Please read section 3.7.4 on ``Using TCP to Send Collector Updates'' on page [*] for more details and a discussion of when you would need this functionality. If you do not enable a socket cache, TCP updates will be refused by the collector. The default value for this setting is 0, with no cache enabled. If you lower this number, you must run condor_ restart and not just condor_ reconfig for the change to take effect.

KEEP_POOL_HISTORY
This boolean macro is used to decide if the collector will write out statistical information about the pool to history files. The default is False. The location, size and frequency of history logging is controlled by the other macros.

POOL_HISTORY_DIR
This macro sets the name of the directory where the history files reside (if history logging is enabled). The default is the SPOOL directory.

POOL_HISTORY_MAX_STORAGE
This macro sets the maximum combined size of the history files. When the size of the history files is close to this limit, the oldest information will be discarded. Thus, the larger this parameter's value is, the larger the time range for which history will be available. The default value is 10000000 (10 Mbytes).

POOL_HISTORY_SAMPLING_INTERVAL
This macro sets the interval, in seconds, between samples for history logging purposes. When a sample is taken, the collector goes through the information it holds, and summarizes it. The information is written to the history file once for each 4 samples. The default (and recommended) value is 60 seconds. Setting this macro's value too low will increase the load on the collector, while setting it to high will produce less precise statistical information.

COLLECTOR_DAEMON_STATS
This macro controls whether or not the Collector keeps update statistics on incoming updates. The default value is True. If this option is enabled, the collector will insert several attributes into ClassAds that it stores and sends. ClassAds without the ``UpdateSequenceNumber'' and ``DaemonStartTime'' attributes will not be counted, and will not have attributes inserted (all modern Condor daemons which publish ClassAds publish these attributes).

The attributes inserted are ``UpdatesTotal'', ``UpdatesSequenced'', and ``UpdatesLost''. ``UpdatesTotal'' is the total number of updates (of this ad type) the Collector has received from this host. ``UpdatesSequenced'' is the number of updates that the Collector could have as lost. In particular, for the first update from a daemon it is impossible to tell if any previous ones have been lost or not. ``UpdatesLost'' is the number of updates that the Collector has detected as being lost.

COLLECTOR_DAEMON_HISTORY_SIZE
This macro controls the size of the published update history that the Collector inserts into the ClassAds it stores and sends. The default value is 128, which means that history is stored and published for the latest 128 updates. This macro is ignored if $(COLLECTOR_DAEMON_STATS) is not enabled.

If this has a non-zero value, the Collector will insert ``UpdatesHistory'' into the ClassAd (similar to ``UpdatesTotal'' above). ``UpdatesHistory'' is a hexadecimal string which represents a bitmap of the last COLLECTOR_DAEMON_HISTORY_SIZE updates. The most significant bit (MSB) of the bitmap represents the most recent update, and the least significant bit (LSB) represents the least recent. A value of zero means that the update was not lost, and a value of 1 indicates that the update was detected as lost.

For example, if the last update was not lost, the previous lost, and the previous two not, the bitmap would be 0100, and the matching hex digit would be ``4''. Note that the MSB can never be marked as lost because its loss can only be detected by a non-lost update (a ``gap'' is found in the sequence numbers). Thus, UpdatesHistory = "0x40" would be the history for the last 8 updates. If the next updates are all successful, the values published, after each update, would be: 0x20, 0x10, 0x08, 0x04, 0x02, 0x01, 0x00.

COLLECTOR_CLASS_HISTORY_SIZE
This macro controls the size of the published update history that the Collector inserts into the Collector ClassAds it produces. The default value is zero.

If this has a non-zero value, the Collector will insert ``UpdatesClassHistory'' into the Collector ClassAd (similar to ``UpdatesHistory'' above). These are added ``per class'' of ClassAd, however. The classes refer to the ``type'' of ClassAds (i.e. ``Start''). Additionally, there is a ``Total'' class created which represents the history of all ClassAds that this Collector receives.

Note that the collector always publishes Lost, Total and Sequenced counts for all ClassAd ``classes''. This is similar to the statistics gathered if $(COLLECTOR_DAEMON_STATS) is enabled.

COLLECTOR_QUERY_WORKERS
This macro sets the maximum number of ``worker'' processes that the Collector can have. When receiving a query request, the UNIX Collector will ``fork'' a new process to handle the query, freeing the main process to handle other requests. When the number of outstanding ``worker'' processes reaches this maximum, the request is handled by the main process. This macro is ignored on Windows, and its default value is zero. The default configuration, however, has this set to 16.

COLLECTOR_DEBUG
This macro (and other macros related to debug logging in the collector) is described in section 3.3.4 as <SUBSYS>_DEBUG.


3.3.18 condor_ negotiator Configuration File Entries

These macros affect the condor_ negotiator.

NEGOTIATOR_INTERVAL
Sets how often the negotiator starts a negotiation cycle. It is defined in seconds and defaults to 300 (5 minutes).

NEGOTIATOR_CYCLE_DELAY
An integer value that represents the minimum number of seconds that must pass before a new negotiation cycle may start. The default value is 20. NEGOTIATOR_CYCLE_DELAY is intended only for use by Condor experts.

NEGOTIATOR_TIMEOUT
Sets the timeout that the negotiator uses on its network connections to the condor_ schedd and condor_ startds. It is defined in seconds and defaults to 30.

PRIORITY_HALFLIFE
This macro defines the half-life of the user priorities. See section 2.7.2 on User Priorities for details. It is defined in seconds and defaults to 86400 (1 day).

DEFAULT_PRIO_FACTOR
This macro sets the priority factor for local users. See section 2.7.2 on User Priorities for details. Defaults to 1.

NICE_USER_PRIO_FACTOR
This macro sets the priority factor for nice users. See section 2.7.2 on User Priorities for details. Defaults to 10000000.

REMOTE_PRIO_FACTOR
This macro defines the priority factor for remote users (users who who do not belong to the accountant's local domain - see below). See section 2.7.2 on User Priorities for details. Defaults to 10000.

ACCOUNTANT_LOCAL_DOMAIN
This macro is used to decide if a user is local or remote. A user is considered to be in the local domain if the UID_DOMAIN matches the value of this macro. Usually, this macro is set to the local UID_DOMAIN. If it is not defined, all users are considered local.

MAX_ACCOUNTANT_DATABASE_SIZE
This macro defines the maximum size (in bytes) that the accountant database log file can reach before it is truncated (which re-writes the file in a more compact format). If, after truncating, the file is larger than one half the maximum size specified with this macro, the maximum size will be automatically expanded. The default is 1 megabyte (1000000).

NEGOTIATOR_DISCOUNT_SUSPENDED_RESOURCES
This macro tells the negotiator to not count resources that are suspended when calculating the number of resources a user is using. Defaults to false, that is, a user is still charged for a resource even when that resource has suspended the job.

NEGOTIATOR_SOCKET_CACHE_SIZE
This macro defines the maximum number of sockets that the negotiator keeps in its open socket cache. Caching open sockets makes the negotiation protocol more efficient by eliminating the need for socket connection establishment for each negotiation cycle. The default is currently 16. To be effective, this parameter should be set to a value greater than the number of condor_ schedds submitting jobs to the negotiator at any time. If you lower this number, you must run condor_ restart and not just condor_ reconfig for the change to take effect.

NEGOTIATOR_PRE_JOB_RANK
Resources that match a request are first sorted by this expression. If there are any ties in the rank of the top choice, the top resources are sorted by the user-supplied rank in the job ClassAd, then by NEGOTIATOR_POST_JOB_RANK, then by PREEMPTION_RANK (if the match would cause preemption and there are still any ties in the top choice). MY refers to attributes of the machine ClassAd and TARGET refers to the job ClassAd. The purpose of the pre job rank is to allow the pool administrator to override any other rankings, in order to optimize overall throughput. For example, it is commonly used to minimize preemption, even if the job rank prefers a machine that is busy. If undefined, this expression has no effect on the ranking of matches. The standard configuration file shipped with Condor specifies an expression to steer jobs away from busy resources:

NEGOTIATOR_PRE_JOB_RANK = RemoteOwner =?= UNDEFINED

NEGOTIATOR_POST_JOB_RANK
Resources that match a request are first sorted by NEGOTIATOR_PRE_JOB_RANK. If there are any ties in the rank of the top choice, the top resources are sorted by the user-supplied rank in the job ClassAd, then by NEGOTIATOR_POST_JOB_RANK, then by PREEMPTION_RANK (if the match would cause preemption and there are still any ties in the top choice). MY refers to attributes of the machine ClassAd and TARGET refers to the job ClassAd. The purpose of the post job rank is to allow the pool administrator to choose between machines that the job ranks equally. The default value is undefined, which causes this rank to have no effect on the ranking of matches. The following example expression steers jobs toward faster machines and tends to fill a cluster of multi-processors by spreading across all machines before filling up individual machines. In this example, the expression is chosen to have no effect when preemption would take place, allowing control to pass on to PREEMPTION_RANK.

UWCS_NEGOTIATOR_POST_JOB_RANK = \
 (RemoteOwner =?= UNDEFINED) * (KFlops - VirtualMachineID)

PREEMPTION_REQUIREMENTS
When considering user priorities, the negotiator will not preempt a job running on a given machine unless the PREEMPTION_REQUIREMENTS expression evaluates to True and the owner of the idle job has a better priority than the owner of the running job. The PREEMPTION_REQUIREMENTS expression is evaluated within the context of the candidate machine ClassAd and the candidate idle job ClassAd; thus the MY scope prefix refers to the machine ClassAd, and the TARGET scope prefix refers to the ClassAd of the idle (candidate) job. If not explicitly set in the Condor configuration file, the default value for this expression is True. Note that this setting does not influence other potential causes of preemption, such as startd RANK, or PREEMPT expressions. See section 3.5.10 for a general discussion of limiting preemption.

PREEMPTION_RANK
Resources that match a request are first sorted by NEGOTIATOR_PRE_JOB_RANK. If there are any ties in the rank of the top choice, the top resources are sorted by the user-supplied rank in the job ClassAd, then by NEGOTIATOR_POST_JOB_RANK, then by PREEMPTION_RANK (if the match would cause preemption and there are still any ties in the top choice). MY refers to attributes of the machine ClassAd and TARGET refers to the job ClassAd. This expression is used to rank machines that the job and the other negotiation expressions rank the same. For example, if the job has no preference, it is usually preferable to preempt a job with a small ImageSize instead of a job with a large ImageSize. The default is to rank all preemptable matches the same. However, the negotiator will always prefer to match the job with an idle machine over a preemptable machine, if none of the other ranks express a preference between them.

NEGOTIATOR_DEBUG
This macro (and other settings related to debug logging in the negotiator) is described in section 3.3.4 as <SUBSYS>_DEBUG.

NEGOTIATOR_MAX_TIME_PER_SUBMITTER
This macro limits the amount of time the negotiator will spend with a submitter. It defaults to one year.

The following configuration macros affect negotiation for group users.
GROUP_NAMES
A comma-separated list of the recognized group names, case insensitive. If undefined (the default), group support is disabled. Group names must not conflict with any user names. That is, if there is a physics group, there may not be a physics user. Any group that is defined here must also have a quota, or the group will be ignored. Example:
    GROUP_NAMES = group_physics, group_chemistry

GROUP_QUOTA_<groupname>
A positive integer to represent a static quota specifying the exact number of machines owned by this group. Note that Condor does not verify or check consistency of quota values. Example:
    GROUP_QUOTA_group_physics = 20
    GROUP_QUOTA_group_chemistry = 10

GROUP_PRIO_FACTOR_<groupname>
A floating point value greater than or equal to 1.0 to specify the default user priority factor for <groupname>. The group name must also be specified in the GROUP_NAMES list. GROUP_PRIO_FACTOR_<groupname> is evaluated when the negotiator first negotiates for the user as a member of the group. All members of the group inherit the default priority factor when no other value is present. For example, the following setting specifies that all members of the group named group_physics inherit a default user priority factor of 2.0:
    GROUP_PRIO_FACTOR_group_physics = 2.0

GROUP_AUTOREGROUP
A boolean value (defaults to False) that when True, causes users who submitted to a specific group to also negotiate a second time with the none group, to be considered with the independent job submitters. This allows group submitted jobs to be matched with idle machines even if the group is over its quota.

GROUP_AUTOREGROUP_<groupname>
This is the same as GROUP_AUTOREGROUP, but it is settable on a per-group basis. If no value is specified for a given group, the default behavior is determined by GROUP_AUTOREGROUP, which in turn defaults to False.

NEGOTIATOR_CONSIDER_PREEMPTION
For expert users only. A boolean value (defaults to True), that when False, can cause the negotiator to run faster and also have better spinning pie accuracy. Only set this to False if PREEMPTION_REQUIREMENTS is False, and if all condor_ startd rank expressions are False.


3.3.19 condor_ credd Configuration File Macros

CREDD_HOST
The host name of the machine running the condor_ credd daemon.

CREDD_CACHE_LOCALLY
A boolean value that defaults to False. When True, the first successful password fetch operation to the condor_ credd daemon causes the password to be stashed in a local, secure password store. Subsequent uses of that password do not require communication with the condor_ credd daemon.


3.3.20 condor_ gridmanager Configuration File Entries

These macros affect the condor_ gridmanager.

GRIDMANAGER_LOG
Logs for the condor_ gridmanager will be written as the user who submitted the individual jobs. As a result GRIDMANAGER_LOG should defined to incorporate $(USERNAME) to specify a different file for each user in a directory that users will be able to write into. An example definition:
  GRIDMANAGER_LOG = /tmp/GridmanagerLog.$(USERNAME)

GRIDMANAGER_CHECKPROXY_INTERVAL
The number of seconds between checks for an updated X509 proxy credential. The default is 10 minutes (600 seconds).

GRIDMANAGER_MINIMUM_PROXY_TIME
The minimum number of seconds before expiration of the X509 proxy credential for the gridmanager to continue operation. If seconds until expiration is less than this number, the gridmanager will shutdown and wait for a refreshed proxy credential. The default is 3 minutes (180 seconds).

HOLD_JOB_IF_CREDENTIAL_EXPIRES
True or False. Defaults to True. If True, and for grid universe jobs only, Condor-G will place a job on hold GRIDMANAGER_MINIMUM_PROXY_TIME seconds before the proxy expires. If False, the job will stay in the last known state, and Condor-G will periodically check to see if the job's proxy has been refreshed, at which point management of the job will resume.

GRIDMANAGER_CONTACT_SCHEDD_DELAY
The minimum number of seconds between connections to the condor_ schedd. The default is 5 seconds.

GRIDMANAGER_JOB_PROBE_INTERVAL
The number of seconds between active probes of the status of a submitted job. The default is 5 minutes (300 seconds).

CONDOR_JOB_POLL_INTERVAL
After a condor grid type job is submitted, how often (in seconds) the condor_ gridmanager should probe the remote condor_ schedd to check the jobs status. This defaults to 300 seconds (5 minutes). Setting this to a lower number will decrease latency (Condor will discover that a job has finished more quickly), but will increase network traffic.

GRIDMANAGER_RESOURCE_PROBE_INTERVAL
When a resource appears to be down, how often (in seconds) the condor_ gridmanager should ping it to test if it is up again.

GRIDMANAGER_RESOURCE_PROBE_DELAY
The number of seconds between pings of a remote resource that is currently down. The default is 5 minutes (300 seconds).

GRIDMANAGER_EMPTY_RESOURCE_DELAY
The number of seconds that the condor_ gridmanager retains information about a grid resource, once the condor_ gridmanager has no active jobs on that resource. An active job is a grid universe job that is in the queue, but is not in the HELD state. Defaults to 300 seconds.

GRIDMANAGER_MAX_SUBMITTED_JOBS_PER_RESOURCE
Limits the number of jobs that a condor_ gridmanager daemon will submit to a resource. It is useful for controlling the number of jobmanager processes running on the front-end node of a cluster. This number may be exceeded if it is reduced through the use of condor_ reconfig while the condor_ gridmanager is running or if the condor_ gridmanager receives new jobs from the condor_ schedd that were already submitted (that is, their GridJobId is not undefined). In these cases, submitted jobs will not be killed, but no new jobs can be submitted until the number of submitted jobs falls below the current limit. Defaults to 100.

GRIDMANAGER_MAX_PENDING_SUBMITS_PER_RESOURCE
The maximum number of jobs that can be in the process of being submitted at any time (that is, how many globus_gram_client_job_request() calls are pending). It is useful for controlling the number of new connections/processes created at a given time. The default value is 5. This variable allows you to set different limits for each resource. After the first integer in the value comes a list of resourcename/number pairs, where each number is the limit for that resource. If a resource is not in the list, Condor uses the first integer. An example usage:
GRIDMANAGER_MAX_PENDING_SUBMITS_PER_RESOURCE=20,nostos,5,beak,50

GRIDMANAGER_MAX_PENDING_SUBMITS
Configuration variable still recognized, but the name has changed to be GRIDMANAGER_MAX_PENDING_SUBMITS_PER_RESOURCE.

GRIDMANAGER_MAX_JOBMANAGERS_PER_RESOURCE
For grid jobs of type gt2, limits the number of globus-job-manager processes that the condor_ gridmanager lets run at a time on the remote head node. Allowing too many globus-job-managers to run causes severe load on the headnote, possibly making it non-functional. This number may be exceeded if it is reduced through the use of condor_ reconfig while the condor_ gridmanager is running or if some globus-job-managers take a few extra seconds to exit. The value 0 means there is no limit. The default value is 10.

GAHP
The full path to the binary of the GAHP server. This configuration variable is no longer used. Use GT2_GAHP at section 3.3.20 instead.

GAHP_ARGS
Arguments to be passed to the GAHP server. This configuration variable is no longer used.

GRIDMANAGER_GAHP_CALL_TIMEOUT
The number of seconds after which a pending GAHP command should time out. The default is 5 minutes (300 seconds).

GRIDMANAGER_MAX_PENDING_REQUESTS
The maximum number of GAHP commands that can be pending at any time. The default is 50.

GRIDMANAGER_CONNECT_FAILURE_RETRY_COUNT
The number of times to retry a command that failed due to a timeout or a failed connection. The default is 3.

GRIDMANAGER_GLOBUS_COMMIT_TIMEOUT
The duration, in seconds, of the two phase commit timeout to Globus for gt2 jobs only. This maps directly to the two_phase setting in the Globus RSL.

GLOBUS_GATEKEEPER_TIMEOUT
The number of seconds after which if a gt2 grid universe job fails to ping the gatekeeper, the job will be put on hold. Defaults to 5 days (in seconds).

C_GAHP_LOG
The complete path and file name of the Condor GAHP server's log. There is no default value. The expected location as defined in the example configuration is /temp/CGAHPLog.$(USERNAME).

MAX_C_GAHP_LOG
The maximum size of the C_GAHP_LOG.

C_GAHP_WORKER_THREAD_LOG
The complete path and file name of the Condor GAHP worker process' log. There is no default value. The expected location as defined in the example configuration is /temp/CGAHPWorkerLog.$(USERNAME).

GLITE_LOCATION
The complete path to the directory containing the Glite software. There is no default value. The expected location as given in the example configuration is $(LIB)/glite. The necessary Glite software is included with Condor, and is required for pbs and lsf jobs.

CONDOR_GAHP
The complete path and file name of the Condor GAHP executable. There is no default value. The expected location as given in the example configuration is $(SBIN)/condor_c-gahp.

GT2_GAHP
The complete path and file name of the GT2 GAHP executable. There is no default value. The expected location as given in the example configuration is $(SBIN)/gahp_server.

GT3_GAHP
The complete path and file name of the wrapper script that invokes the GT3 GAHP executable. There is no default value. The expected location as given in the example configuration is $(SBIN)/gt3_gahp.

GT4_GAHP
The complete path and file name of the wrapper script that invokes the GT4 GAHP executable. There is no default value. The expected location as given in the example configuration is $(SBIN)/gt4_gahp.

PBS_GAHP
The complete path and file name of the PBS GAHP executable. There is no default value. The expected location as given in the example configuration is $(GLITE_LOCATION)/bin/batch_gahp.

LSF_GAHP
The complete path and file name of the LSF GAHP executable. There is no default value. The expected location as given in the example configuration is $(GLITE_LOCATION)/bin/batch_gahp.

UNICORE_GAHP
The complete path and file name of the wrapper script that invokes the Unicore GAHP executable. There is no default value. The expected location as given in the example configuration is $(SBIN)/unicore_gahp.

NORDUGRID_GAHP
The complete path and file name of the wrapper script that invokes the NorduGrid GAHP executable. There is no default value. The expected location as given in the example configuration is $(SBIN)/nordugrid_gahp.


3.3.21 grid_monitor Configuration File Entries

These macros affect the grid_monitor.

ENABLE_GRID_MONITOR
When set to True enables the grid_monitor tool. The grid_monitor tool is used to reduce load on Globus gatekeepers. This parameter only affects grid jobs of type gt2. GRID_MONITOR must also be correctly configured. Defaults to False. See section 5.3.2 on page [*] for more information.

GRID_MONITOR
The complete pathname of the grid_monitor tool used to reduce load on Globus gatekeepers. This parameter only affects grid jobs of type gt2. This parameter is not referenced unless ENABLE_GRID_MONITOR is set to True. See section 5.3.2 on page [*] for more information.

GRID_MONITOR_HEARTBEAT_TIMEOUT
If this many seconds pass without hearing from a grid_monitor, it is assumed to be dead. Defaults to 300 (5 minutes). Increasing this number will improve the ability of the grid_monitor to survive in the face of transient problems but will also increase the time before Condor notices a problem.

GRID_MONITOR_RETRY_DURATION
If something goes wrong with the grid_monitor at a particular site (like GRID_MONITOR_HEARTBEAT_TIMEOUT expiring), Condor-G will attempt to restart the grid_monitor for this many seconds. Defaults to 900 (15 minutes). If this duration passes without success the grid_monitor will be disabled for the site in question until 60 minutes have passed.


3.3.22 Configuration File Entries Relating to Grid Usage and Glidein

These macros affect the Condor's usage of grid resources and glidein.

GLIDEIN_SERVER_URLS
A comma or space-separated list of URLs that contain the binaries that must be copied by condor_ glidein. There are no default values, but working URLs that copy from the UW site are provided in the distributed sample configuration files.


3.3.23 Configuration File Entries for DAGMan

These macros affect the operation of DAGMan and DAGMan jobs within Condor.

DAGMAN_MAX_SUBMITS_PER_INTERVAL
An integer that controls how many individual jobs condor_ dagman will submit in a row before servicing other requests (such as a condor_ rm). The legal range of values is 1 to 1000. If defined with a value less than 1, the value 1 will be used. If defined with a value greater than 1000, the value 1000 will be used. If not defined, it defaults to 5.

DAGMAN_MAX_SUBMIT_ATTEMPTS
An integer that controls how many times in a row condor_ dagman will attempt to execute condor_ submit for a given job before giving up. Note that consecutive attempts use an exponential backoff, starting with 1 second. The legal range of values is 1 to 16. If defined with a value less than 1, the value 1 will be used. If defined with a value greater than 16, the value 16 will be used. Note that a value of 16 would result in condor_ dagman trying for approximately 36 hours before giving up. If not defined, it defaults to 6 (approximately two minutes before giving up).

DAGMAN_SUBMIT_DELAY
An integer that controls the number of seconds that condor_ dagman will sleep before submitting consecutive jobs. It can be increased to help reduce the load on the condor_ schedd daemon. The legal range of values is 0 to 60. If defined with a value less than 0, the value 0 will be used. If defined with a value greater than 60, the value 60 will be used. The default value is 0.

DAGMAN_STARTUP_CYCLE_DETECT
A boolean value that when True causes condor_ dagman to check for cycles in the DAG before submitting DAG node jobs, in addition to its run time cycle detection. If not defined, it defaults to False.

DAGMAN_RETRY_SUBMIT_FIRST
A boolean value that controls whether a failed submit is retried first (before any other submits) or last (after all other ready jobs are submitted). If this value is set to True, when a job submit fails, the job is placed at the head of the queue of ready jobs, so that it will be submitted again before any other jobs are submitted (this has been the behavior of condor_ dagman up to this point). If this value is set to False, when a job submit fails, the job is placed at the tail of the queue of ready jobs. If not defined, it defaults to True.

DAGMAN_RETRY_NODE_FIRST
A boolean value that controls whether a failed node (with retries) is retried first (before any other ready nodes) or last (after all other ready nodes). If this value is set to True, when a node with retries fails (after the submit succeeded), the node is placed at the head of the queue of ready nodes, so that it will be tried again before any other jobs are submitted. If this value is set to False, when a node with retries fails, the node is placed at the tail of the queue of ready nodes (this has been the behavior of condor_ dagman up to this point). If not defined, it defaults to False.

DAGMAN_MAX_JOBS_IDLE
An integer value that controls the maximum number of idle node jobs allowed within the DAG before condor_ dagman temporarily stops submitting jobs. Once idle jobs start to run, condor_ dagman will resume submitting jobs. If both the command-line flag and the configuration parameter are specified, the command-line flag overrides the configuration parameter. The default is that there is no limit on the maximum number of idle jobs.

DAGMAN_MAX_JOBS_SUBMITTED
An integer value that controls the maximum number of node jobs within the DAG that will be submitted to Condor at one time. Note that this parameter is the same as the -maxjobs command-line flag to condor_submit_dag. If both the command-line flag and the configuration parameter are specified, the command-line flag overrides the configuration parameter. The default is that there is no limit on the maximum number of jobs run at one time.

DAGMAN_MUNGE_NODE_NAMES
A boolean value that controls whether condor_ dagman automatically renames nodes when running multiple DAGs (the renaming is done to avoid possible name conflicts). If this value is set to True, all node names have the "DAG number" prepended to them. For example, the first DAG specified on the condor_ submit_dag command line is considered DAG number 0, the second is DAG number 1, etc. So if DAG number 2 has a node B, that node will internally be renamed to "2.B". If not defined, DAGMAN_MUNGE_NODE_NAMES defaults to True.

DAGMAN_IGNORE_DUPLICATE_JOB_EXECUTION
This macro is no longer used. The improved functionality of the DAGMAN_ALLOW_EVENTS macro eliminates the need for this variable.

A boolean value that controls whether condor_ dagman aborts or continues with a DAG in the rare case that Condor erroneously executes the job within a DAG node more than once. A bug in Condor very occasionally causes a job to run twice. Running a job twice is contrary to the semantics of a DAG. The configuration macro DAGMAN_IGNORE_DUPLICATE_JOB_EXECUTION determines whether condor_ dagman considers this a fatal error or not. The default value is False; condor_ dagman considers running the job more than once a fatal error, logs this fact, and aborts the DAG. When set to True, condor_ dagman still logs this fact, but continues with the DAG.

This configuration macro is to remain at its default value except in the case where a site encounters the Condor bug in which DAG job nodes are executed twice, and where it is certain that having a DAG job node run twice will not corrupt the DAG. The logged messages within *.dagman.out files in the case of that a node job runs twice contain the string "EVENT ERROR."

DAGMAN_ALLOW_EVENTS
An integer that controls which "bad" events are considered fatal errors by condor_ dagman. This macro replaces and expands upon the functionality of the DAGMAN_IGNORE_DUPLICATE_JOB_EXECUTION macro. If DAGMAN_ALLOW_EVENTS is set, it overrides the setting of DAGMAN_IGNORE_DUPLICATE_JOB_EXECUTION.

The DAGMAN_ALLOW_EVENTS value is a bitwise-OR of the following values:

0= allow no "bad" events
1= allow almost all "bad" events (all except "job re-run after terminated event")
2= allow terminated/aborted event combination
4= allow "job re-run after terminated event" bug
8= allow garbage/orphan events
16 = allow execute or terminate event before job's submit event
32 = allow two terminated events per job (sometimes seen with grid jobs)
64 = allow duplicated events in general

The default value is 114 (allow terminated/aborted event combination, allow execute and/or terminated event before job's submit event, allow double terminated events, and allow general duplicate events).

For example, a value of 6 instructs condor_ dagman to allow both the terminated/aborted event combination and the "job re-run after terminated event" bug. A value of 0 means that any "bad" event will be considered a fatal error.

A value of 5 (1 + 4) will never abort the DAG because of a "bad" event - but you should almost never use this setting, because the "job re-run after terminated event" bug breaks the semantics of the DAG.

This macro should almost always remain set to the default value!

DAGMAN_DEBUG
This macro is described in section 3.3.4 as <SUBSYS>_DEBUG.

MAX_DAGMAN_LOG
This macro is described in section 3.3.4 as MAX_<SUBSYS>_LOG.

DAGMAN_CONDOR_SUBMIT_EXE
The executable that condor_ dagman will use to submit Condor jobs. If not defined, condor_ dagman looks for condor_ submit in the PATH.

DAGMAN_STORK_SUBMIT_EXE
The executable that condor_ dagman will use to submit Stork jobs. If not defined, condor_ dagman looks for stork_ submit in the PATH.

DAGMAN_CONDOR_RM_EXE
The executable that condor_ dagman will use to remove Condor jobs. If not defined, condor_ dagman looks for condor_ rm in the PATH.

DAGMAN_STORK_RM_EXE
The executable that condor_ dagman will use to remove Stork jobs. If not defined, condor_ dagman looks for stork_ rm in the PATH.

DAGMAN_PROHIBIT_MULTI_JOBS
A boolean value that controls whether condor_ dagman prohibits node job submit files that queue multiple job procs (other than parallel universe). If a DAG references such a submit file, the DAG will abort during the initialization process. If not defined, DAGMAN_PROHIBIT_MULTI_JOBS defaults to False.

DAGMAN_LOG_ON_NFS_IS_ERROR
A boolean value that controls whether condor_ dagman prohibits node job submit files with user log files on NFS. If a DAG references such a submit file and DAGMAN_LOG_ON_NFS_IS_ERROR is True, the DAG will abort during the initialization process. If DAGMAN_LOG_ON_NFS_IS_ERROR is False, a warning will be issued but the DAG will still be submitted. It is strongly recommended that DAGMAN_LOG_ON_NFS_IS_ERROR remain set to the default value, because running a DAG with node job log files on NFS will often cause errors. If not defined, DAGMAN_LOG_ON_NFS_IS_ERROR defaults to True.

DAGMAN_ABORT_DUPLICATES
A boolean value that controls whether to attempt to abort duplicate instances of condor_ dagman running the same DAG on the same machine. When condor_ dagman starts up, if no DAG lock file exists, condor_ dagman creates the lock file and writes its PID into it. If the lock file does exist, and DAGMAN_ABORT_DUPLICATES is set to True, condor_ dagman checks whether a process with the given PID exists, and if so, it assumes that there is already another instance of condor_ dagman running on the same DAG. Note that this test is not foolproof: it is possible that, if condor_ dagman crashes, the same PID gets reused by another process before condor_ dagman gets rerun on that DAG. This should be quite rare, however. If not defined, DAGMAN_ABORT_DUPLICATES defaults to False.

DAGMAN_PENDING_REPORT_INTERVAL
An integer value (in seconds) that controls how often condor_ dagman will print a report of pending nodes to the dagman.out file. Note that the report will only be printed if condor_ dagman has been waiting at least DAGMAN_PENDING_REPORT_INTERVAL seconds without seeing any node job user log events, in order to avoid cluttering the dagman.out file. (This feature is mainly intended to help diagnose "stuck" condor_ dagman processes that are waiting indefinitely for a job to finish.) If not defined, DAGMAN_PENDING_REPORT_INTERVAL defaults to 600 seconds (10 minutes).


3.3.24 Configuration File Entries Relating to Security

These macros affect the secure operation of Condor. Many of these macros are described in section 3.6 on Security.

SEC_*_AUTHENTICATION
\fbox{This section has not yet been written}

SEC_*_ENCRYPTION
\fbox{This section has not yet been written}

SEC_*_INTEGRITY
\fbox{This section has not yet been written}

SEC_*_NEGOTIATION
\fbox{This section has not yet been written}

SEC_*_AUTHENTICATION_METHODS
\fbox{This section has not yet been written}

SEC_*_CRYPTO_METHODS
\fbox{This section has not yet been written}

GSI_DAEMON_NAME
A comma separated list of the subject name(s) of the certificate(s) that the daemons use.

GSI_DAEMON_DIRECTORY
A directory name used in the construction of complete paths for the configuration variables GSI_DAEMON_CERT, GSI_DAEMON_KEY, and GSI_DAEMON_TRUSTED_CA_DIR, for any of these configuration variables are not explicitly set.

GSI_DAEMON_CERT
A complete path and file name to the X.509 certificate to be used in GSI authentication. If this configuration variable is not defined, and GSI_DAEMON_DIRECTORY is defined, then Condor uses GSI_DAEMON_DIRECTORY to construct the path and file name as
GSI_DAEMON_CERT  = $(GSI_DAEMON_DIRECTORY)/hostcert.pem

GSI_DAEMON_KEY
A complete path and file name to the X.509 private key to be used in GSI authentication. If this configuration variable is not defined, and GSI_DAEMON_DIRECTORY is defined, then Condor uses GSI_DAEMON_DIRECTORY to construct the path and file name as
GSI_DAEMON_KEY  = $(GSI_DAEMON_DIRECTORY)/hostkey.pem

GSI_DAEMON_TRUSTED_CA_DIR
The directory that contains the list of trusted certification authorities to be used in GSI authentication. The files in this directory are the public keys and signing policies of the trusted certification authorities. If this configuration variable is not defined, and GSI_DAEMON_DIRECTORY is defined, then Condor uses GSI_DAEMON_DIRECTORY to construct the directory path as
GSI_DAEMON_TRUSTED_CA_DIR  = $(GSI_DAEMON_DIRECTORY)/certificates

GSI_DAEMON_PROXY
A complete path and file name to the X.509 proxy to be used in GSI authentication. When this configuration variable is defined, use of this proxy takes precedence over use of a certificate and key.

DELEGATE_JOB_GSI_CREDENTIALS
A boolean value that defaults to True for Condor version 6.7.19 and more recent versions. When True, a job's GSI X.509 credentials are delegated, instead of being copied. This results in a more secure communication when not encrypted.

GRIDMAP
The complete path and file name of the Globus Gridmap file. The Gridmap file is used to map X.509 distinguished names to Condor user ids.

SEC_DEFAULT_SESSION_DURATION
The amount of time in seconds before a communication session expires. Defaults to 8640000 seconds (100 days) to avoid a bug in session renegotiation for Condor Version 6.6.0. A session is a record of necessary information to do communication between a client and daemon, and is protected by a shared secret key. The session expires to reduce the window of opportunity where the key may be compromised by attack.

FS_REMOTE_DIR
The location of a file visible to both server and client in Remote File System authentication. The default when not defined is the directory /shared/scratch/tmp.

ENCRYPT_EXECUTE_DIRECTORY
The execute directory for jobs on Windows platforms may be encrypted by setting this configuration variable to True. Defaults to False. The method of encryption uses the EFS (Encrypted File System) feature of Windows NTFS v5.

SEC_TCP_SESSION_TIMEOUT
The length of time in seconds until the timeout when establishing a UDP security session via TCP. The default value is 20 seconds. Scalability issues with a large pool would be the only basis for a change from the default value.

SEC_PASSWORD_FILE
For Unix machines, the path and file name of the file containing the pool password for password authentication.

AUTH_SSL_SERVER_CAFILE
The path and file name of a file containing one or more trusted CA's certificates for the server side of a communication authenticating with SSL.

AUTH_SSL_CLIENT_CAFILE
The path and file name of a file containing one or more trusted CA's certificates for the client side of a communication authenticating with SSL.

AUTH_SSL_SERVER_CADIR
The path to a directory that may contain the certificates (each in its own file) for multiple trusted CAs for the server side of a communication authenticating with SSL. When defined, the authenticating entity's certificate is utilized to identify the trusted CA's certificate within the directory.

AUTH_SSL_CLIENT_CADIR
The path to a directory that may contain the certificates (each in its own file) for multiple trusted CAs for the client side of a communication authenticating with SSL. When defined, the authenticating entity's certificate is utilized to identify the trusted CA's certificate within the directory.

AUTH_SSL_SERVER_CERTFILE
The path and file name of the file containing the public certificate for the server side of a communication authenticating with SSL.

AUTH_SSL_CLIENT_CERTFILE
The path and file name of the file containing the public certificate for the client side of a communication authenticating with SSL.

AUTH_SSL_SERVER_KEYFILE
The path and file name of the file containing the private key for the server side of a communication authenticating with SSL.

AUTH_SSL_CLIENT_KEYFILE
The path and file name of the file containing the private key for the client side of a communication authenticating with SSL.

CERTIFICATE_MAPFILE
A path and file name of the unified map file.


3.3.25 Configuration File Entries Relating to High Availability

These macros affect the high availability operation of Condor.

MASTER_HA_LIST
Similar to DAEMON_LIST, this macro defines a list of daemons that the condor_ master starts and keeps its watchful eyes on. However, the MASTER_HA_LIST daemons are run in a High Availability mode. The list is a comma or space separated list of subsystem names (as listed in section 3.3.1). For example,
        MASTER_HA_LIST = SCHEDD

The High Availability feature allows for several condor_ master daemons (most likely on separate machines) to work together to insure that a particular service stays available. These condor_ master daemons ensure that one and only one of them will have the listed daemons running.

To use this feature, the lock URL must be set with HA_LOCK_URL.

Currently, only file URLs are supported (those with file:... ). The default value for MASTER_HA_LIST is the empty string, which disables the feature.

HA_LOCK_URL
This macro specifies the URL that the condor_ master processes use to synchronize for the High Availability service. Currently, only file URLs are supported; for example, file:/share/spool. Note that this URL must be identical for all condor_ master processes sharing this resource. For condor_ schedd sharing, we recommend setting up SPOOL on an NFS share and having all High Availability condor_ schedd processes sharing it, and setting the HA_LOCK_URL to point at this directory as well. For example:
        MASTER_HA_LIST = SCHEDD
        SPOOL = /share/spool
        HA_LOCK_URL = file:/share/spool

A separate lock is created for each High Availability daemon.

There is no default value for HA_LOCK_URL.

HA_<SUBSYS>_LOCK_URL
This macro controls the High Availability lock URL for a specific subsystem as specified in the configuration variable name, and it overrides the system-wide lock URL specified by HA_LOCK_URL. If not defined for each subsystem, HA_<SUBSYS>_LOCK_URL is ignored, and the value of HA_LOCK_URL is used.

HA_LOCK_HOLD_TIME
This macro specifies the number of seconds that the condor_ master will hold the lock for each High Availability daemon. Upon gaining the shared lock, the condor_ master will hold the lock for this number of seconds. Additionally, the condor_ master will periodically renew each lock as long as the condor_ master and the daemon are running. When the daemon dies, or the condor_ master exists, the condor_ master will immediately release the lock(s) it holds.

HA_LOCK_HOLD_TIME defaults to 3600 seconds (one hour).

HA_<SUBSYS>_LOCK_HOLD_TIME
This macro controls the High Availability lock hold time for a specific subsystem as specified in the configuration variable name, and it overrides the system wide poll period specified by HA_LOCK_HOLD_TIME. If not defined for each subsystem, HA_<SUBSYS>_LOCK_HOLD_TIME is ignored, and the value of HA_LOCK_HOLD_TIME is used.

HA_POLL_PERIOD
This macro specifies how often the condor_ master polls the High Availability locks to see if any locks are either stale (meaning not updated for HA_LOCK_HOLD_TIME seconds), or have been released by the owning condor_ master. Additionally, the condor_ master renews any locks that it holds during these polls.

HA_POLL_PERIOD defaults to 300 seconds (five minutes).

HA_<SUBSYS>_POLL_PERIOD
This macro controls the High Availability poll period for a specific subsystem as specified in the configuration variable name, and it overrides the system wide poll period specified by HA_POLL_PERIOD. If not defined for each subsystem, HA_<SUBSYS>_POLL_PERIOD is ignored, and the value of HA_POLL_PERIOD is used.

MASTER_<SUBSYS>_CONTROLLER
Used only in HA configurations involving the condor_ had.

The condor_ master has the concept of a controlling and controlled daemon, typically with the condor_ had daemon serving as the controlling process. In this case, all condor_ on and condor_ off commands directed at controlled daemons are given to the controlling daemon, which then handles the command, and, when required, sends appropriate commands to the condor_ master to do the actual work. This allows the controlling daemon to know the state of the controlled daemon.

As of 6.7.14, this configuration variable must be specified for all configurations using condor_ had. To configure the condor_ negotiator controlled by condor_ had:

MASTER_NEGOTIATOR_CONTROLLER = HAD

The macro is named by substituting <SUBSYS> with the appropriate subsystem string as defined in section 3.3.1.

HAD_LIST
A comma-separated list of all condor_ had daemons in the form IP:port or hostname:port. Each central manager machine that runs the condor_ had daemon should appear in this list. If HAD_USE_PRIMARY is set to True, then the first machine in this list is the primary central manager, and all others in the list are backups.

All central manager machines must be configured with an identical HAD_LIST. The machine addresses are identical to the addresses defined in COLLECTOR_HOST.

HAD_USE_PRIMARY
Boolean value to determine if the first machine in the HAD_LIST configuration variable is a primary central manager. Defaults to False.

HAD_CONNECTION_TIMEOUT
The time (in seconds) that the condor_ had daemon waits before giving up on the establishment of a TCP connection. The failure of the communication connection is the detection mechanism for the failure of a central manager machine. For a LAN, a recommended value is 2 seconds. The use of authentication (by Condor) increases the connection time. The default value is 5 seconds. If this value is set too low, condor_ had daemons will incorrectly assume the failure of other machines.

HAD_ARGS
Command line arguments passed by the condor_ master daemon as it invokes the condor_ had daemon. To make high availability work, the condor_ had daemon requires the port number it is to use. This argument is of the form
   -p $(HAD_PORT_NUMBER)
where HAD_PORT_NUMBER is a helper configuration variable defined with the desired port number. Note that this port number must be the same value here as used in HAD_LIST. There is no default value.

HAD
The path to the condor_ had executable. Normally it is defined relative to $(SBIN). This configuration variable has no default value.

MAX_HAD_LOG
Controls the maximum length in bytes to which the condor_ had daemon log will be allowed to grow. It will grow to the specified length, then be saved to a file with the suffix .old. The .old file is overwritten each time the log is saved, thus the maximum space devoted to logging is twice the maximum length of this log file. A value of 0 specifies that this file may grow without bounds. The default is 1 Mbyte.

HAD_DEBUG
Logging level for the condor_ had daemon. See <SUBSYS>_DEBUG for values.

HAD_LOG
Full path and file name of the log file. There is no default value.

REPLICATION_LIST
A comma-separated list of all condor_ replication daemons in the form IP:port or hostname:port. Each central manager machine that runs the condor_ had daemon should appear in this list. All potential central manager machines must be configured with an identical REPLICATION_LIST.

STATE_FILE
A full path and file name of the file protected by the replication mechanism. When not defined, the default path and file used is
  $(SPOOL)/Accountantnew.log

REPLICATION_INTERVAL
Sets how often the condor_ replication daemon initiates its tasks of replicating the $(STATE_FILE). It is defined in seconds and defaults to 300 (5 minutes). This is the same as the default NEGOTIATOR_INTERVAL.

MAX_TRANSFER_LIFETIME
A timeout period within which the process that transfers the state file must complete its transfer. The recommended value is 2 * average size of state file / network rate. It is defined in seconds and defaults to 300 (5 minutes).

HAD_UPDATE_INTERVAL
Like UPDATE_INTERVAL, determines how often the condor_ had is to send a ClassAd update to the condor_ collector. Updates are also sent at each and every change in state. It is defined in seconds and defaults to 300 (5 minutes).

HAD_USE_REPLICATION
A boolean value that defaults to False. When True, the use of condor_ replication daemons is enabled.

REPLICATION_ARGS
Command line arguments passed by the condor_ master daemon as it invokes the condor_ replication daemon. To make high availability work, the condor_ replication daemon requires the port number it is to use. This argument is of the form
  -p $(REPLICATION_PORT_NUMBER)
where REPLICATION_PORT_NUMBER is a helper configuration variable defined with the desired port number. Note that this port number must be the same value as used in REPLICATION_LIST. There is no default value.

REPLICATION
The full path and file name of the condor_ replication executable. It is normally defined relative to $(SBIN). There is no default value.

MAX_REPLICATION_LOG
Controls the maximum length in bytes to which the condor_ replication daemon log will be allowed to grow. It will grow to the specified length, then be saved to a file with the suffix .old. The .old file is overwritten each time the log is saved, thus the maximum space devoted to logging is twice the maximum length of this log file. A value of 0 specifies that this file may grow without bounds. The default is 1 Mbyte.

REPLICATION_DEBUG
Logging level for the condor_ replication daemon. See <SUBSYS>_DEBUG for values.

REPLICATION_LOG
Full path and file name to the log file. There is no default value.


3.3.26 Configuration File Entries Relating to Quill

These macros affect the Quill database management and interface to its representation of the job queue.

QUILL
The full path name to the condor_ quill daemon.

QUILL_ARGS
Arguments to be passed to the condor_ quill daemon upon its invocation.

QUILL_LOG
Path to the Quill daemon's log file.

QUILL_ENABLED
A boolean variable that defaults to False. When True, Quill functionality is enabled. When False, the Quill daemon writes a message to its log and exits. The condor_ q and condor_ history tools then do not use Quill.

QUILL_NAME
A string that uniquely identifies an instance of the condor_ quill daemon, as there be more than condor_ quill daemon per pool. The string must not be the same as for any condor_ schedd daemon. A convenient definition to choose is of the form
quill-for-schedd_name@machinename.fully.qualified.address

QUILL_DB_NAME
A string that identifies a database within a database server.

QUILL_DB_IP_ADDR
An IP address of the database server.

QUILL_POLLING_PERIOD
The frequency, in number of seconds, at which the Quill daemon polls the file job_queue.log for updates. New information in the log file is sent to the database. The default value is 10.

QUILL_HISTORY_CLEANING_INTERVAL
The interval, in hours, between scans of the database to identify and delete jobs that are beyond their QUILL_HISTORY_DURATION time. The default value is 24.

QUILL_HISTORY_DURATION
The number of days after entry into the database that a job will remain in the database. After QUILL_HISTORY_DURATION days, the job is deleted.

QUILL_MANAGE_VACUUM
A boolean value that defaults to False. When True, Quill takes on the maintenance task of vacuuming the database. As of PostgreSQL version 8.1, the database can perform this task automatically; therefore having Quill vacuum is not necessary. A value of True causes warnings to be written to the log file.

QUILL_IS_REMOTELY_QUERYABLE
A boolean value that defaults to True. When False, the remote database tables may not be remotely queryable.

QUILL_DB_QUERY_PASSWORD
Defines the password string needed by condor_ q to gain read access for remotely querying the Quill database.

QUILL_ADDRESS_FILE
When defined, it specifies the path and file name of a local file containing the IP address and port number of the Quill daemon. By using the file, tools executed on the local machine do not need to query the central manager in order to find the Quill daemon.


3.3.27 MyProxy Configuration File Macros

In some cases, Condor can autonomously refresh GSI certificate proxies via MyProxy, available from http://myproxy.ncsa.uiuc.edu/.

MYPROXY_GET_DELEGATION
The full path name to the myproxy-get-delegation executable, installed as part of the MyProxy software. Often, it is necessary to wrap the actual executable with a script that sets the environment, such as the LD_LIBRARY_PATH, correctly. If this macro is defined, Condor-G and condor_ credd will have the capability to autonomously refresh proxy certificates. By default, this macro is undefined.


3.3.28 Configuration File Macros Affecting APIs

ENABLE_SOAP
A boolean value that defaults to False. When True, Condor daemons will respond to HTTP PUT commands as if they were SOAP calls. When False, all HTTP PUT commands are denied.

ENABLE_WEB_SERVER
A boolean value that defaults to False. When True, Condor daemons will respond to HTTP GET commands, and send the static files sitting in the subdirectory defined by the configuration variable WEB_ROOT_DIR. In addition, web commands are considered a READ command, so the client will be checked by host-based security.

SOAP_LEAVE_IN_QUEUE
A boolean value that when True, causes a job in the completed state to remain in the queue, instead of being removed based on the completion of file transfer. There is no default value.

WEB_ROOT_DIR
A complete path to the directory containing all the files served by the web server.

<SUBSYS>_ENABLE_SOAP_SSL
A boolean value that defaults to False. When True, enables SOAP over SSL for the specified <SUBSYS>. Any specific <SUBSYS>_ENABLE_SOAP_SSL setting overrides the value of ENABLE_SOAP_SSL.

ENABLE_SOAP_SSL
A boolean value that defaults to False. When True, enables SOAP over SSL for all daemons.

<SUBSYS>_SOAP_SSL_PORT
A required port number on which SOAP over SSL messages are accepted, when SOAP over SSL is enabled. The <SUBSYS> must be specified, because multiple daemons running on a single machine may not share a port. There is no default value.

The macro is named by substituting <SUBSYS> with the appropriate subsystem string as defined in section 3.3.1.

SOAP_SSL_SERVER_KEYFILE
A required complete path and file name to specify the daemon's identity, as used in authentication when SOAP over SSL is enabled. The file is to be an OpenSSL PEM file containing a certificate and private key. There is no default value.

SOAP_SSL_SERVER_KEYFILE_PASSWORD
An optional complete path and file name to specify a password for unlocking the daemon's private key. There is no default value.

SOAP_SSL_CA_FILE
A required complete path and file name to specify a file containing certificates of trusted Certificate Authorities (CAs). Only clients who present a certificate signed by a trusted CA will be authenticated. There is no default value.

SOAP_SSL_CA_DIR
A required complete path to a directory containing certificates of trusted Certificate Authorities (CAs). Only clients who present a certificate signed by a trusted CA will be authenticated. There is no default value.

SOAP_SSL_DH_FILE
An optional complete path and file name to a DH file containing keys for a DH key exchange. There is no default value.


3.3.29 Stork Configuration File Macros

STORK_MAX_NUM_JOBS
An integer limit on the number of concurrent data placement jobs handled by Stork. The default value when not defined is 10.

STORK_MAX_RETRY
An integer limit on the number of attempts for a single data placement job. For data transfers, this includes transfer attempts on the primary protocol, all alternate protocols, and all retries. The default value when not defined is 10.

STORK_MAXDELAY_INMINUTES
An integer limit (in minutes) on the run time for a data placement job, after which the job is considered failed. The default value when not defined is 10, and the minimum legal value is 1.

STORK_TMP_CRED_DIR
The full path to the temporary credential storage directory used by Stork. The default value is /tmp when not defined.

STORK_MODULE_DIR
The full path to the directory containing Stork modules. The default value when not defined is as defined by $(LIBEXEC). It is a fatal error for both STORK_MODULE_DIR and LIBEXEC to be undefined.

CRED_SUPER_USERS
Access to a stored credential is restricted to the user who submitted the credential, and any user names specified in this macro. The format is a space or comma separated list of user names which are valid on the stork_ credd host. The default value of this macro is root on Unix systems, and Administrator on Windows systems.

CRED_STORE_DIR
Directory for storing credentials. This directory must exist prior to starting stork_ credd. It is highly recommended to restrict access permissions to only the directory owner. The default value is $(SPOOL_DIR)/cred.

CRED_INDEX_FILE
Index file path of saved credentials. This file will be automatically created if it does not exist. The default value is $(CRED_STORE_DIR)/cred-index.

DEFAULT_CRED_EXPIRE_THRESHOLD
stork_ credd will attempt to refresh credentials when their remaining lifespan is less than this value. Units = seconds. Default value = 3600 seconds (1 hour).

CRED_CHECK_INTERVAL
stork_ credd periodically checks remaining lifespan of stored credentials, at this interval. Units = seconds. Default value = 60 seconds (1 minute).


next up previous contents index
Next: 3.4 User Priorities and Up: 3. Administrators' Manual Previous: 3.2 Installation   Contents   Index
condor-admin@cs.wisc.edu